Author Interview with Chris Patrick

Chris Patrick is a real estate consultant and founder of The Patrick Group, a premier real estate firm in Las Vegas. With over $100 million sold since 2013, he was named in the top 1% for all Las Vegas Realtors and the number one top producer for Signature Real Estate Group. Previously, he owned three successful businesses and spent 15 satisfying years in sales, marketing, and customer service.

A hard-partying snowboard bum turned successful businessman, Chris’s rise to success was hard-earned and well-deserved. From a young age, he faced adversity as the son of an abusive father in a struggling family. At age 12, he was wrongly accused of and arrested for a horrible crime that destroyed his reputation, leaving him to deal with the trauma in the aftermath of the accusation. Through trials and tribulations, Chris persevered despite setbacks on the road to his eventual success, such as business failures, loss, and heartbreak. He hopes to inspire others to see the opportunity within their own failures, rather than shame and defeat, and overcome their serious hardships, traumatic events, or struggles in order to live their absolute best lives.

Chris currently lives in Las Vegas with his wife Erin, daughter Jameson, and three dogs. Learn more at chrispatrick.net.

Where are you from?

I’m originally from the Bay Area California, then spent 10 years in Colorado snowboarding and I currently live in Las Vegas Nevada.

Why do you write?

I love expressing myself through the written word and find it to be not only a great artistic outlet but a fantastic way to help others.

What do you write about?

Life. I think I have a pretty unique perspective, having gone through some of things I’ve gone

through, and I believe I have valuable information and insight to share with the world. Plus, I like to laugh at my own jokes.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I write in a very conversational tone, like two friends talking over a couple of beers (and shots) at the bar. I’m not opposed to dropping a few expletives if it helps to make a point either, but that’s what friends do!

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing?

Time, mostly. My wife and I have a new baby daughter that we really love spending time with so I have to set aside time specifically for writing.

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

I’m so grateful and blessed that I have been able to have a positive impact on people’s lives. I get a lot of notes, messages and emails telling me how people have made significant

improvements in their lives after reading some of my work. It’s very humbling to say the least.

How long have you been writing?

Disasters To Dreams took about one solid year to write, so about that long professionally.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

My wife and I had just attended a Mike Dooley event in Reno and we got back to the hotel that night and started talking about manifesting our dreams. We somehow got on the subject of writing a book since one of Mike Dooley’s books, Infinite Possibilities, had really inspired me years earlier. I was telling her about some of the crazy things that had happened to me during my life and she said ‘you should write a book about that’.

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

For me, inspiration comes in waves and I try to capitalize on it when it’s high tide. It doesn’t

always work out that way, but in an ideal world I would sit at the computer and write whenever the ideas start coming. Sometimes that happens at 2 in the morning.

Disasters To Dreams: A Gritty Guide to Finding Success In The Face Of Failure: Patrick, Chris: 9780578954547: Amazon.com: Books

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I guess I’m a ‘seat of your pants’ writer in that I’ll start with a general concept but not really have any idea where it’ll end up. I just kind of go with the flow so to speak. I find it more enjoyable than drafting an outline like many writers do. It seems to come more naturally that way for me.

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

Just write. No matter how bad it is, just start. It seems like a no brainer but the only way you get good at something is to keep doing it.

What do you think makes a good story?

I feel that to make an interesting story and a great read you have to keep the reader in mind

first. Make it about them. Of course you also have to have a hero that your readers can relate to, and you have to make the reader care about what happens to the hero.

What does your family think of your writing?

My family has been very supportive of my writing, my amazing wife in particular. She basically held the household together for us while I was off doing my thing during the writing of Disasters To Dreams. I definitely couldn’t have done it without her.

Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely! It’s important that we all chase our dreams and being a great writer is something I’ve thought about for a long time.

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

Yes, I’ve learned over the years that everyone has the same incredible powers at their disposal. I’ve learned that even if you don’t know why something happened to you at that time, eventually you will. I’ve also learned that nobody’s life has been perfect, and that’s a good thing. And no matter where you find yourself right now, you have it within you to live the life you really want.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

As soon as Disasters To Dreams launched on 10/21/21.

Do you have links that you’d like to share for others to read?

Absolutely! Readers can visit my website here where they can read the latest blogs, connect

with me on social media and I even have a free download available now: FROM ROADBLOCK TO ROCK STAR – Smash the 10 Mental Roadblocks Holding You Back from Rockstar Status

Author Interview with Amy Key Zaret

Ever since she sported pigtails and had a huge crush on Bobby Brady, Amy Key has been turning her romantic daydreams into stories. Writer is her official job title, but Amy considers herself a semi-professional fangirl due to her obsession with the television show Supernatural. Her other abilities include ninja reading skills and the ability to constantly learn. She lives with her husband and dog in Dallas, Texas, and she would love to hear from you at amykeyzaret@gmail.com or on https://www.facebook.com/amykeywriter.

Describe yourself in five words

happy, optimistic, intelligent, fun, and kind

What fact about yourself would really surprise people?

People would be surprised that I wanted to be a herpetologist when I was young, that I love roller coasters, and that I intend to skydive someday.

How do you work through self-doubts and fear? 

I pivot off of negative thoughts as quickly as possible. I believe in the law of attraction and that my thoughts create my reality, so it’s important to work through doubt and fear fast.

What scares you the most? 

I am afraid of being the lone survivor of a zombie apocalypse.

What makes you happiest? 

I love traveling and going to the movies with my husband.

Why do you write? 

I write to teach people, even in my fiction.

Have you always enjoyed writing? 

Yes, I wrote stories from an early age.

What motivates you to write? 

I want to teach and entertain people.

What writing are you most proud of?

My latest book, Attract Love Now!, makes me very proud because I know that it will help people find happiness in love.

What are you most proud of in your personal life? 

I am proud of raising my sons and I am proud that I started over at the age of 42 and met and married the man of my dreams!

What books did you love growing up? 

I loved Cinderella, The Little Princess, The Secret Garden, and many more!

What do you hope your obituary will say about you? 

I hope that I will live to be 104 years old and that I will be known as a person who taught and helped others.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live? 

I grew up in Dallas, Texas, USA, and I still live here.

How did you develop your writing?

I wrote and wrote and wrote. Practice is the only way to improve writing. Also, I have a master’s degree in humanities and I did many creative writing courses.

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing? 

I find marketing to be the most challenging.

Do you find it hard to share your work? 

No, I love to share what I have written.

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you? 

My family is extremely encouraging and supportive.

What else do you do, other than write? 

I read, go to movies, travel, exercise, and go to fan conventions for the show Supernatural.

What other jobs have you had in your life? 

I was an English and European history teacher for fifteen years.

If you could study any subject at university what would you pick? 

I would still pick literature, history, and art

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be? 

I would love to live in England or New Orleans, Louisiana.

How do you write – lap top, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk? 

I write on a laptop, mostly.

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge and thank for their support? 

I would love to thank my husband, Mike, for his wholehearted support of me and my work!

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you? 

I am a successful writer when people read and enjoy my books.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?  

Attract Love Now is a guide intended to help people meet the romantic partner of their dreams. I wrote it to be an inspiration to anyone who despairs of ever finding soulmate love.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

I want people to have hope after reading my latest book. No matter what your age, weight, or appearance, you can have true love.

An Interview with Author Daniela Joy Voigt

Daniela Joy Voigt

Joy Voigt (Daniela), born in Mexico, has spent the better part of the last two decades traveling and learning across many places on the globe. Deeply passionate about the intersection between the primordial human experience and her spiritual journey, she has spent much of her life living in Buddhist Temples and meditation centers. A massage therapist by trade, she finds much of her expression through multiple mediums such as writing, making music, dancing, weaving and floral sculpture. Joy’s main interest in life is learning the art of true listening.

Please visit http://www.mandalasproject.com for updates on upcoming releases, as well as other offerings.

Describe yourself in five words

Open, curious, intrigued by life

What fact about yourself would really surprise people? 

At the core, I am a very shy person even though many folks think of me as open, confident and bold. And, this book itself is quite surprising. If you met me, you’d never think I’d write a dark fiction and I too never expected to have quite a lot of darkness come through in my writing. But there you go.

How do you work through self-doubts and fear? 

I am quite curious about fear. I find it to be a goldmine, usually. Beneath its rough façade, if I keep my ear to the ground on it and stay humble, it usually reveals some deep untapped resources within myself.

What scares you the most?

Letting fear fester inside me.

What makes you happiest? 

Loving others.

Why do you write? 

Because I deeply enjoy it and learn so much about myself through the process. I find writing accesses parts of myself that no other medium are able to tap into.

Have you always enjoyed writing? 

Yes, even as a little girl I’d spend a lot of time coming up with lyrics in my head and found quite an ignited part of me when doing so. As I said, I am quite shy so writing really suits my introverted need to express myself.

What motivates you to write? 

I can’t say that I do much in the order of self-motivation. Inspiration usually gallops into my world in the most unexpected of moments and it’s one of those things where I either get on the ride with it or it quite literally passes me by, in search perhaps, of someone willing to listen and take the adventure.

What writing are you most proud of?

My latest novel, ¨Fox Woman Dreaming¨ and a poem I wrote while being in a long winter retreat titled, ¨The Bounty.¨

What are you most proud of in your personal life? 

It’s not exactly being proud of it since I didn’t do much to deserve this, but I really appreciate that there seems to be a seemingly great store of kindness that is always on tap for my friends and for people I care for. I really appreciate that about myself.

What books did you love growing up? 

I was a big Nancy Drew fan and my dad introduced me to Greek myths when I was quite young so I’ve always had some gravitational pull toward them, even as a young one. 

What do you hope your obituary will say about you? 

Answered the call when friends asked for help.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live? 

I grew up in Mexico and have lived in many, many places across the globe. I currently reside in a small emerald island of the coast of Washington called Friday Harbor.

How did you develop your writing?

I’d say it’s a two part recipe: Firstly reading a ton – I’d read so much that, to this day, the librarians of many of the places I have lived in are close buddies of mine. Secondly, needing an outlet to understand chapters of my life. Although principally writing fiction and poetry, writing has become a kind of self-discovery tool that keeps me coming back for more. In many ways, I would say that I feel courted by words and it’s not so much that I am doing the writing but more that I have gotten a front row seat to the wild and almost mystical world of language.

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing? 

I find marketing to be the area I know the least about and hence sometimes deem it as hard. But calling it hard makes it sound like it is undoable, or at least that’s how I interpret it. I’d call it the area that I am most in the state of continuous learning.

What marketing works for you? 

Interviews seem to really work for me.

Do you find it hard to share your work? 

Only when I make it about myself. Otherwise, it feels quite organic.

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you? 

Oddly yes! And they are quite the fuel to my fire. I’m not quite sure what I did to deserve such incredible people in my life but I am forever grateful to the close circle friends and family that I have.

What else do you do, other than write? 

I am a bodyworker by trade and a musician by enjoyment.

What other jobs have you had in your life? 

That’s a very long list.

If you could study any subject at university what would you pick? 

Uh-oh. Only one? I’d choose Dance but would sit in the back of many a physiotherapy class and epistemology course.

How do you write – lap top, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk? 

I often get hit with a chapter of a book or poem while I am far from any writing implement so I memorize as much of it as I can and have actually sprinted to my computer to catch the words before they fly away.

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge and thank for their support? 

My friends, deeply. I would be a crust of a human being if it weren’t for the amount of love, support and care that I have received continuously over many years.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you? 

I have fun and like myself throughout the whole process.

It is vital to get exposure and target the right readers for your writing, tell us about your marketing campaign? 

My campaign is a bit of a learn as I go methodology. Maybe not the best strategy but it’s kind of my only choice at the moment.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?

¨Fox Woman Dreaming¨ is a dark fiction that explores the subject of repression, utopia and the wild human spirit. It follows the story of Sybil, a Dreammaker who lives in a world where people have been tailored to be the Perfect versions of themselves, disallowing any of the more uncouth and wilder sides of the human psyche to be around. Sybil works for the Company, a corporation that sells dreams to Consumers, manicuring reality with a very particular set of morals. It is when Sybil discovers that there is more to her than a Good and Correct person that things get a little strange and so begins her journey into discovering more about her humanity and, ultimately, her own voice.

I wrote it because I needed to grapple with my own understanding of being Good and Correct. Morality is a place of great inner questioning for me. I lived for about two decades in a state of discipleship and, as of late, I am exploring what it is like to embody what I have learned and what it would look like for my own voice to take root within me.  

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax? 

I deeply enjoy beholding nature, that is one of the most relaxing things I can do. That, and watching YouTube videos of animals being rescued. I am a big sucker for that.

I have a 28 day pre-sale link available with special perks for folks buying the book before it is released.

Kickstarter link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1776416211/fox-woman-dreaming-and-on-becoming-human?ref=thanks-share&fbclid=IwAR0uLcRzelVxABP_LLQZbSFebS66gYDnYFOMXPNLTpgV3lGGhEFinfNrI0o

My website: www.mandalasproject.com

Author Interview with Alex G. Zarate

Alex G. Zarate

Long (LONG) ago, Alex was born somewhere in Texas when a rip in space/time opened a dimensional rift that nearly wiped out all of humanity. (It might have been a little different but he was newborn and hadn’t thought to take notes.)

Alex writes books, creates worlds and ventures forth to take pictures of this planet he shares with you kind co-inhabitants of this lovely blue orb.  (Thank you for that. Y’all are great!)  It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, so when he posts online, this is always at the forefront of his mind.  Some of the words he uses are shared wisdom and others are hopeful insights.

Feel free to check out the Instagram link below.  (Don’t be afraid.  It won’t bite.) 

Alex also likes to draw and illustrate his books.  He is constantly crafting stories in his head when he should be paying attention to the road.  But until he can stop time, (This is on his “To-do” list)  he will make do with the allotted hours at his disposal.

Despite the limited time span of each day and the grim reaper trying to sneak up on him whenever he gets distracted by shiny things, Alex follows his passions.

Most of all, he creates.

Whether it is the next book in a series, a blog topic to cover, a new place to take pictures that he just can’t get out of his head or new illustrations that continue to prompt him for more tweaking, Alex seeks out new and creative ways of expressing himself.

In the meantime, Alex travels to distant worlds, fights monsters on a bi-weekly basis, peers into alternate dimensions when they grab his attention and once in a while, when the inclination is upon him… he saves the world.

It’s a hobby.

Alex sleeps between blinks or when his eyes close unexpectedly.

He and Snoopy have word sprints for fun on weekends and holidays

Where are you from?

I’m originally from Massol, a small town on the moon.  No, not this one.  Around Saturn.  Nice little place but pricey.  I like it here more.  Better sunsets, interesting people.  Plus, the air is free!

Why do you write?

It’s a calling. I’m a creative. Writing is part of who I am.

What do you write about?

Other worlds, mysteries, fighting darkness and reaching for the light

Do you have a specific writing style?

My style falls somewhere between Dean Koontz, Ray Bradbury and Edgar Allen Poe

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

Mostly allocating time to the task. Scheduling is key to any creative lifestyle.

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

That my book was the best thing to come along when they needed help with overcoming life’s challenges.

How long have you been writing?

All my life

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

When I realized books were written by people

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

Mostly I write at night. I do some writing during the day but I write well into midnight every night.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I like to have classical music playing, a snack on hand and coffee or tea to sip

How long does it take to write a book?

Some have taken months and others, years. It varies depending on the project.

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

Read lots and write more.

What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story? The challenge of describing what I see in my head. When the story is taking shape, I want to follow it full steam but describing every scene and character turns a complicated scene into a project in itself.

What do you think makes a good story?

Good characters, relatable situations and a worthwhile struggle by the end.

What does your family think of your writing?

My family always discouraged me from writing until I became a published author.

Do you see writing as a career?

Definitely

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

I want you all to enjoy what I write. My Nonfiction is meant to encourage everyone on a daily basis. My Fiction has dark situations but will always have a happy ending to look forward to.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I always considered my self a writer. A writer writes. Am I a bestseller? No. A household name? No. Am I following my writing passion? Always.

https://www.facebook.com/aIexgzarate/

https://anchor.fm/alex-g-zarate

https://www.tiktok.com/@alexgzarate?lang=en

An Interview with Author Thomas Michael Thomas

*Tells us about The Evil Within the House

 I love Occult-lore and Science Fiction, but I wanted that to be the backdrop in a natural setting. So, I introduce the audience to two poor teenagers who have rough family lives, while coping with the tragic death of their best friend set in 1984. Their séance goes wrong, and they seek out further spiritual guidance, while they search for a mysterious pendant, that is rumored to have healing properties. As the story developed, Jake and Clarence kind of took off on their own, and their dialog and reactions grew dramatically as the story progressed. Plus, it is fun to write about seances in graveyards, tasseography, and portals to the astral world, also it was fun to explore on my made-up sci-fi word, that I am coining in this interview, Metageometroncalchemaltransmission. My next book, the prequel to The Evil Within the House will dive further into interdimensional travel.

I threw the kitchen sink at the audience with this one. In short, if you like coming-of-age movies like Stand by Me and have a love for the X-Files, then The Evil Within the House should be right up your alley.

*Why do you write?

I have always written, and wanted to publish, it has just taken focus and dedication to create something that I am content with. Self-publishing makes it a lot easier for any author to get started. Especially with Amazon’s print on demand. I was surprised how well physical copies have sold versus e-book’s.

*What motivates you to write?

I read a lot of horror novels, particularly paperbacks from the 1980’s. They were known as spin-rack paperbacks, put out by a company called Zebra. They have been tagged as paperbacks from hell, the artwork is flashy, and the writing is more daring than mainstream horror.

*How do you write?

Most of my ideas develop when I go for a long run. Usually, I email myself notes through out the day and form an outline at night. When I wrote The Evil Within the House, I had constructed the dialog for each scene while I was away from my computer. For me, it is easier to work on dialog as if a movie is playing out in my head. By the time I write the dialog, the clunky parts are figured out.

*How much sleep do you get during the process?

In the few weeks leading up to publishing, I got very little sleep. I received good criticism from my beta-readers and applied most of their suggestions, since the book has a few time jumps. The week before publishing, I read and re-read the book multiple times, via Text to Speech, I think I got 12 hours of sleep in three days, right before I hit print.

*If you could have a dinner party and invite anyone dead or alive, who would you ask?

Kurt Vonnegut and Quentin Tarantino You can follow me on Twitter @ThomasMichaelT9

An Author Interview with Susan Jagannath (99c book deal for Diwali)

Susan Jagannath

Susan Jagannath successfully combined a passion for reading, a love of writing and a fascination for technology, to create a career in technical writing. With over 50 technical manuals (not) to her name, “RTFM” could have been the motto for her life; but she didn’t let the idea that no one ever reads the manual stop her from thoroughly enjoying her work.

As an army brat, her childhood included seven different schools, three universities and a couple of emergency evacuations from conflict zones. Travel and adventure were a normal part of life. She now believes in seizing every opportunity to have a new adventure. Whether it’s camping on the beach in Australia, trekking in the Himalayas, kayaking in Queensland, whitewater rafting down the Ganges, or walking the Camino in Spain, her philosophy is to pack it into one or two weeks to create memories for a lifetime, (and disconnect from television and computer games).

Susan is now on the next adventure of her life, traveling, writing travel books, and planning her next book.

Two Himalayan books are on 99c deal for Diwali

Describe yourself in five words

Adventurous, Risk-taking, Loyal, Funny and Innovative

What fact about yourself would really surprise people?

I’m a grandmother who hikes, loves travel and has adventures

How do you work through self-doubts and fear?

I walk them off in long hikes in nature

What scares you the most?

Dying without making a difference to the world

What makes you happiest?

Completing a book and seeing readers read it and comment.

Why do you write?

Because I must – it’s an addiction

Have you always enjoyed writing? 

Absolutely – for as long as I could read, I also wrote

What motivates you to write?

Sharing my adventures, hikes and learnings with those who maybe think they are too old, too weak, too <insert excuse here>

What writing are you most proud of? 

The Valley of Flowers – the book about the hike in the Himalayas, and it was especially wonderful to hike it with friends.

What are you most proud of in your personal life? 

A bit astonished that I am a completely doting grandmother!

What books did you love growing up? 

Enid Blyton, Narnia and Amar Chitra Katha – the latter are a comic book series about Indian mythology.

What do you hope your obituary will say about you?

She loved a lot, family, friends and adventures

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live? 

I grew up all over India in various army bases, I now live in Australia.

How did you develop your writing?

I was a technical writer for top IT and computer application firms..I wrote manuals, online help, websites and so on for over thirty years

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing?

Marketing

What marketing works for you?

A mixture of organic and paid

Do you find it hard to share your work? 

No, not at all

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you? 

yes, I am blessed with a supportive family and friends

What else do you do, other than write? 

Is there anything else worth doing?

What other jobs have you had in your life?

Checkout chick, teacher, computer geek, technical writer, content specialist

How do you write – lap top, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk? 

At a desk

How much sleep do you need to be your best? 

seven to eight hours a night

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge and thank for their support?

My husband for following along on all my out there ideas.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you? 

Of course, bestseller status on Amazon

It is vital to get exposure and target the right readers for your writing, tell us about your marketing campaign? 

I have a careful strategy for launching a new <or old> book, with exact dates, and additional deliverables.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?

I am writing a book on Chakras. I’m writing it to help people unlock their inner author.

If you could have a dinner party and invite anyone dead or alive, who would you ask? 

My Dad, Diana Gabaldon and all my family.

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax?

I don’t

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel? Inspired to go out and try something new

The Key to the Secret – An Interview with Author Mina Faraway

Mina Faraway

Dearest Reader,
I’ve been practicing the Law of Attraction since childhood. I started by finding the first star in the sky and reciting a popular nursery rhyme. It goes:

Star Light, Star Bright,

First star I see tonight,

Wish I may, wish I might,

Have the wish I wish tonight.

Then I would make my wish with all my heart. I believe I received everything I wished for and truly wanted. Being a child, I forgot about my wish during the day, not realizing at the time it was the “letting go” part of the process.

When I became an adult, I stopped making wishes and reciting the poem, but I continued to get almost everything I wanted and set my mind to. When I wanted a specific job, they hired me. When I wanted something physical, I earned enough to buy it myself; I bartered for it; or someone gifted it to me. After all, I had learned that wishes come true.

I wrote The Key to the Secret to share the epiphanies, or inspired thoughts, that helped me connect the dots between some of the Law of Attraction teachings. The ones I specifically struggled with in the daily chaos of life included how you transition from imagining and visualizing what you want, to “letting go” and living your life as if you have it all now. I hope it helps you find ways to “game the system” of your own mental processes in a way that’s fun and fulfilling, so you can receive everything you desire faster.

I’m literally living my ideal schedule and the life I wanted right now, and it happened much faster than I expected. Just remember to go through every step and review and recite what you have written. Feel it and live is now as closely as you can. When you can’t physically do so, use your vibrant imagination to fool yourself into living it.

1. Define your purpose

2. Decide what you will provide in exchange for success

3. Set a date for when you will achieve it

4. Have faith and confidence

5. Embrace your negative thoughts

6. Live your ideal schedule

7. Fool yourself into your passion

8. Visualize your day

9. Practice gratitude and appreciation

10. Let believe you have it already

11. Take action on inspired ideas

12. “Donate” your bills and outstanding debt

13. Place whatever you desire in your Universe shopping cart

14. Describe your ideal relationships

15. Sign a contract with the Universe

Remember The Key to the Secret and you’ll be absolutely unstoppable.

I’m so happy and grateful for you.

~ Mina

What is The Key to the Secret about?

It’s a Law of Attraction book for readers already familiar with the law of attraction and manifesting, but who may be struggling with the hardest parts of the process, especially when it comes to believing you have what you desire now, fooling yourself into living your dream life, and letting go. 

Why did you write this book?

I’ve practiced the Law of Attraction off and on throughout my life. I’ve been thrilled by successes and frustrated by setbacks. When I made a personal break through recently, it seemed so simple I couldn’t believe I’d missed it, and yet those of us struggling with manifesting simply do miss it. I wanted to help you make the same, easy connections that I did, because they really work. Then things happen – fast!

Describe yourself in five words.

Happy, content, purposeful, present, and living my life’s purpose – and you can too!

However, those descriptions didn’t apply even 2 months ago. I was struggling. What I wanted most still wasn’t happening and I didn’t know why. I consumed everything I could and slowly the pieces of the puzzle came together. That’s when everything clicked for me. I had discovered the key.

I wrote The Key to the Secret to share those pieces with you so you can live your life’s purpose too. It’s part book, part workbook and designed to guide you through the stickiest parts of manifesting for your own breakthroughs. The steps are faster and easier than you think. You do need to have a very vivid imagination and you do need to take steps forward every day, but when you’re doing what you love, it’s such a joyful process. It will feel like you can breathe again.

How do you work through self-doubts and fear? 

It’s impossible to block all negative thoughts and worries. If you try, they seem to get louder and stronger. Jack Canfield of Chicken Soup for the Soul says, “Cancel. Cancel. Cancel.” Rhonda Byrne of The Secret has a wonderful “welcoming exercise”, where you hug your negative thoughts and then let them go. In The Key to the Secret, it’s about identifying the negative thought and replacing it with a positive equivalent. Then you cross out the negative version and recite the positive affirmation every day from there on out. There are many exercises out there though – it’s whatever works best for you. Try them all until you find one that works!

What scares you the most? 

Like everyone, failure. Not being able to support my family. Looking foolish in front of those who are important. But once I realized those fears were in my own head (no one else’s), it all dissipated.

When you reveal your purpose to those around you, you’ll be surprised at who supports you and who doesn’t. To me, it’s a weeding out process and a necessary and healthy one.

When you’re doing what you love, it’s not work. You become radiant, which benefits everyone around you. And when you see how quickly you could be living the real you and how happy you’ll be, those around you who want the best for you will love and appreciate the change in you. Those who don’t will naturally fall away. Don’t mourn their absence because you will start attracting other people who do support you.

What makes you happiest?

Acknowledging my true path. I’m not resisting it anymore. Practicing gratitude for everything I have every day, several times a day. Having the tools and energy to help others in the ways I’m able to fills me up.

I’m showing my children I’m full of joy and love what I do and demonstrating that anything is possible and I would like you to do the same for yourself, your family, and your children!

What fact about yourself would really surprise people? 

I’m trilingual, but I probably couldn’t order a meal in the other 2 languages now, it’s been so long! I’ve worked in law enforcement, information technology, and business consulting, but my most enjoyable projects were all writing-based. I keep returning to writing, so I know it’s my life’s purpose. I don’t consider writing work. It just flows. I lose track of time.

Think about what your bliss is and focus on how to do more of it. Don’t worry about the money or the time right now – knowing where you’re going is the number one priority. Then take the next step and the next, and before you realize it, you’ll be there.

Where are you from?

I’m a native to the state of Colorado, in the United States. I’ve traveled the world and seen some incredible places, but this is home. It’s an extremely harsh environment. I joke that every season is trying to kill you.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

I want you to know it’s not as hard as it seems at first to make things happen. But manifesting what you want does take work. Be clear about what you want. Visualize the end goal. Don’t worry about how to get from here to there. Take small steps and actions every day that are aligned with your purpose. Fire up your vivid imagination and belief system to prepare you for the opportunities that will arise. Enjoy the game of it. Be ready for miracles. It happens faster than you think.

What else would you like people to know?

If you’re struggling with manifesting your desires, join our community here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/keytothesecret/

I send out inspirational quotes on Twitter and Instagram for a daily boost:

https://www.instagram.com/minafaraway

Reach out! My author page is here: https://www.facebook.com/minafaraway

I also offer the first 6 chapters of The Key to the Secret for free here: https://dl.bookfunnel.com/77zgc6ow4r

I’ll be releasing the follow-up book to The Key to the Secret with even more advanced techniques soon. You can sign up to be notified when it comes out here: https://dl.bookfunnel.com/731k0cw4mk

Author Interview with James Rosenberg 

James Rosenberg is a third generation attorney who has tried cases in a multitude of jurisdictions. He utilizes his experience cross examining recalcitrant witnesses as a basis for his legal thrillers. When not practicing law he hangs out with his wife, three kids and Allie the dog. –This text refers to the paperback edition.

  • Where are you from?

I live in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I’ve worked as a lawyer for the past 30 some years. I play as an author. By writing I get to decide how each case ends, rather than letting a jury decide the result.

  • Why do you write? 

I write for many reasons. When I first started to write is partly as a stress reducer and partly because stories started percolating in my head and they had to get out.  There are not many things better than watching a story develop on paper. With each chapter I learn more about my characters, their pasts, their motivations and what evil may lurk in their hearts.

  • What do you write about? 

My books are generally classified as Legal Thrillers, but I think they are much more than that. Each book is actually a study of character relationships. Plot is very important, but it’s how the characters’ actions affect the people they know that is at the center of the stories I write.

  • Do you have a specific writing style?

Like I said, my stories are very much plot driven and I find that simplicity in writing allows the plot to move forward. I am not a big fan of long descriptive passages, so I avoid them. I want to see how a character reacts to a specific situation which allows me, and the reader, to learn much more about who this character is. 

  • What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

My biggest obstacle to writing is time. I still work full-time as a lawyer, so I have to squeeze in my writing time when not working or playing with my family. This means I have to economical with my writing. I have to get to work and get the words down to move the story along.

  • What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

I think it was when a reader wrote me a letter (yes, a pen-to-paper letter not an email) saying how much he was moved by reading The Jersey. His account of his emotional journey through the book and the bond he felt with Charlie because what had been going on in his life moved me.

  • How long have you been writing?

I started writing late—about seven years ago. My first writing was an essay about an experience my son had in Little League and how it moved me. Once I realized how cathartic writing could be for me and how much others could get out reading what I had written, I couldn’t stop.

  •  When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

When I was young I had no interest in writing. As a lawyer, I get to write a lot, but it’s a different kind of writing. Once my life settled down a bit and I was able to get some stories onto paper, I realized I never wanted it to end. This is what I’ll be doing until I can’t think anymore.

  • What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

When I’m writing, I am very disciplined. I allocate 20-30 minutes each day with the goal of getting 1000 words out. If I can follow that schedule, I can get a book done in four months. It always takes longer, and the editing process takes about as long as getting the first draft done, but getting a new chapter done and pushing the story towards the finish line is awesome.

  • What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I would say it’s that I don’t outline. I know in my head where a story starts and where it ends, but it’s the rest of the story that I don’t really know until it’s written. That’s why I love to get words down because I’m learning so much about the story as it comes out and get so excited when a new plot point surprises me.

  • How long does it take to write a book? (if you’ve written one -published or non)

If I follow my schedule, it takes almost a year to get a book finished. I have to take the time to write the story, but the multiple rounds of editing take huge amounts of additional time and energy. This doesn’t take into account marketing for my other books or getting a cover developed for the latest book.

  • Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

The best ways to become a better writer are to read and to write. Read in your genre, but also read in other genres. Read the best writers and be mindful of how they craft a story or how they choose to portray characters or plot. But you also have to write, write, write.  If you write everyday and critically evaluate your writing and style, you will improve, and your readers will notice.

  • What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story?

My stories usually involve a trial. Trials are very wordy. I worry that line after line of dialogue can be challenging for the reader. I work hard to make my trial scenes realistic, but also modify reality to try and make the interactions among the participants even more involving for the reader.

  • What do you think makes a good story?

Conflict. This comes in many varieties. In my stories, when there is a trial, there are inherent conflicts among the participants. There are winners and losers at every trial. But to me, although trials are essential plot elements in my books, the true conflict is between the characters. Often, they want similar things and conflict ensues when only one can achieve their goals. I think this makes legal novels gripping to read.

  • What does your family think of your writing? 

At first, I think they were a little wary. My kids were worried about being embarrassed. With success writing, I think their wariness has transformed more into pride. My first book was modeled after an experience of one of my kids. Now the others want to be the models for the next book. I’m working hard to satisfy them.

  • Do you see writing as a career?

Hopefully. I still practice as a lawyer, but I would love to move full time to writing. That’s also scary. I have been a lawyer for a long time and it’s a major part of my identity. Giving that up would be difficult, but I really do love to write.

  • Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

Thanks for taking the time to read through this interview. Also, thanks for thinking about trying one of my books.

  • When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Even after I finished my first book, Legal Reserves, I couldn’t call myself an author. I felt like a fraud. But once the book started to sell and move up lists, I began to think that people actually liked what I wrote. Once I saw my books were selling in countries around the world and I received positive feedback, it helped my confidence as a writer. I find it much easier now to call myself a writer.

https://jamesrosenbergauthor.com/

Goodreads:

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/RosenbergWrites

Author Interview with Aaron LA.V.R.

Aaron LA. V.R. grew up in Michigan, spending most of his childhood creating his own adventures. Inspired by popular science fiction movies, cartoons, and video games, he would often create stories he either wrote or acted out while playing with friends. As a teenager, he became interested in music and turned those childhood stories into songs. As an adult, he found his way into the world of news, working as a news producer and freelance writer. After many years of searching for the right medium to express his creativity, he is here, hoping to share his imagination and experiences with you as an author.

Where are you from?

I grew up in the United States in the state of Michigan. I’m from the west side of the state, actually, close to Lake Michigan. It’s a very pretty area and fairly quiet. 

Why do you write? 

Well, I write because I’m very emotional and need an infinite universe to vent my emotions, hahaha. No, but really I write because I have an overactive imagination and need an infinite universe to express my creativity. There is no limit to what you can become or create when you’re writing, no taxes, no hidden fees, no red tape, just freedom. So, I guess you could say I write so I can be free.

What do you write about? 

In general, what I write about really depends on my mood for the most part. Sometimes I will write uplifting stories other times; I will write sad or mysterious ones. That type of writing is actually more connected to when I was writing songs and creating rap music, though. But what I enjoy writing about the most is science fiction! I love the action and adventure and space! It’s so awesome! When I was young, I was always intrigued by the stars and the thought of what was beyond them. I used to spend hours at the library reading astronomy books. I was also a big-time anime, manga, superhero cartoon, video game and sci-fi movie nerd, to top all of it, hahaha.     

Do you have a specific writing style?

If I had to put a name to it, I would call it movie-style writing. When I’m writing, it’s almost like I’m watching a movie in my mind. I can see the scenes playing out from a to b and hear the dialogue taking place while it’s all happening. I don’t know if it is like that for everyone. People always have told me that I’m weird, so maybe that’s not normal, hahaha.

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

For me, it’s probably motivation. Sometimes I will sit and stare at a blank page for hours and not write a thing. It’s not that I can’t get some words on the screen or page; it’s just that I don’t feel like writing. I’m a very lazy creative sometimes. . . But When I feel like writing, I’m taking off!

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

Someone told me that my story delivered. That was the coolest thing to hear! The main thing I’m worried about when people are reading my book is if it delivered, so that was just super awesome!

How long have you been writing?

It’s been like 15 years. I have written a lot of things that I never tried to use. I’m my own worse critic at times, I think. I had a few book ideas over the years that I just never finished because of that. I may actually revisit some of those now that I finally have something published.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

I think it was when I realized I was a storyteller. I was writing songs and news articles for years and never really considered myself a writer, even though I had been doing it for half my life. One day it just kind of dawned on me that I was doing more than just writing; I was telling stories. It was at that point that I kind of made the decision that I wanted to be an author and write novels

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

Honestly, it’s like having two jobs. This goes back to the motivation thing I was talking about earlier. So, I work on news stories for 8 hours, then I go home and stare at a blank screen and decide if I want to write some more, hahaha. I usually fall asleep at that point! But every so often, I find the motivation to write more!

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I think I have a way of drawing the reader in and making them see what they’re reading in their mind. So my movie-style writing, I guess.

How long does it take to write a book?

The first book that I recently published, “Absonbrite: Shadows in the Lighthouse” took 3.5 years. I was actually learning the process of how to write a novel while writing that one, so it took some time. Now that I have a rough idea of what I’m doing, we will see how long it will take me to write the second one.   

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

I would say use the story engine method when writing. Develop your characters, backstories and the plot before you write. Having source material to draw from will help you move forward when you hit those nasty writing blocks! Look at the different styles of writing 1st person, 2nd person, etc. Also, be descriptive, learn how to use details. Readers want to be able to see, hear, and feel what your characters are going through. So describe to me what they are feeling, where they are at, and what they are learning from it all. 

What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story?

The biggest challenge was what to write about. So I knew I wanted to write a science fiction story, but I didn’t know what kind. I narrowed it down with the story engine method I mentioned before. Another thing was knowing what to write next. So you’ve got an amazing 1st chapter; how do you follow it up? The answer I found was simple, just continue to tell the story. You really have to let go of the what-ifs, and the how do I,  when you’re writing and just continue to tell the story. It all comes together in the end.        

What do you think makes a good story?

In general, I would have to say layers. A story with layers is going to take the reader deeper and deeper every chapter they read, all the way to the bottom of the rabbit hole. So depth is what makes a story good, in my opinion.

What does your family think of your writing? 

Most of my family members haven’t read my book, hahaha. But the few who have liked it.

Do you see writing as a career?

In the long term, yes. But at the moment, I’m just an amateur. I have a lot to learn and a long way to go still.

Do you have anything specific you would like to tell the readers?

Yes, I do! When you read my book “Absonbrite: Shadows in the Lighthouse,” please leave me a review! I need to know if my writing stinks and what I need to improve on! Thanks in advance!

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100073954657763

An interview with Author G. David Walker

G. David Walker

G. David Walker was unexpectedly born in Ulysses, Kansas on a bright, sunny morning in July of 1963, the youngest of four brothers and one sister. As the internet had not yet been invented when David was a young man, he instead devoured any science fiction or fantasy book that he could get his hands on, dreaming of different worlds, fantastical creatures and strange, alien beings. As an adult, he decided to forge into the realms he had only read about, creating his own worlds to explore.

He currently lives in southwest Missouri. For more information, visit his blog, Chasing Dragons in the Ozarks, at http://gdavidwalker.com/

Describe yourself in five words
Hm, that’s not as easy a question as it looks. I don’t think about myself all that often, but I’ll give it a shot. Five words, let’s see… Homebody, analytical, casual, observer, empathetic

What fact about yourself would really surprise people?  
People meeting me for the first time might find it hard to believe that I once performed in a rock band in Las Vegas. Doesn’t quite fit the quiet, mildly reserved image I have now.

How do you work through self-doubts and fear?
Self-doubt is definitely more crippling than fear. Basically, you just have to tell yourself that the only person you have to prove anything to in the end is yourself. I think of a line from “Facing the Giants” where a kid is afraid to try out for the football team. His father tells him, “What have you got to lose? You’re already NOT on the team.” You never have a chance to move forward until you take the first step.

What scares you the most?
Other then some more common phobias, what scares me the most is letting people down who rely on me.

Why do you write?
Too many ideas in my head not to. I’ve got a Word document with almost sixty pages of story ideas, scene snippets, dialogue, character ideas, and more. If I never added another word to the document, I have enough prompts to last the rest of my life. Of course, I’m always adding to it, so I’ll never run out of stories to tell.

Have you always enjoyed writing?  
I’ve always enjoyed the written word, whether that be reading, editing, proofreading or writing. In my younger years, I read voraciously. Then, I finally decided to start creating my own worlds for others to explore in the hopes that they would enjoy my stories as much as I enjoyed others’.

What writing are you most proud of?  
Anything that helps someone get away from the real world for a little while or anything that helps someone deal with problems they may be facing.

What books did you love growing up?   
Pretty much anything science fiction. Although I mainly write fantasy now, I grew up on sci-fi. Eventually, I’ll put some of my science fiction ideas down on paper too.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live?  
In my younger years, we moved around a lot. My adoptive father was in construction, so by the time I finished fourth grade, I was living in my ninth city in my third state (Kansas, California, Missouri). After college, I moved to Las Vegas for about six years, but now I’m back in SW Missouri.

How did you develop your writing?
Write, write, and then write some more. I’ve read numerous books on the art of writing, even taken a couple of courses. But in the end, as they say, practice makes perfect, or if not perfect, at least better than before the practice.

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing?   
For me, the marketing is definitely the most challenging. As someone who prefers to stay behind the scenes, putting myself out in front of the world is a little difficult. But, as a self-published author, that just comes with the territory.

Do you find it hard to share your work?
Once it’s in a state where it’s ready to be shared, not really. The hard part is getting it to where I think it’s worth sharing. Rewriting sections, fixing mistakes and typos, filling plot holes, basically going over a manuscript again and again and again until I’m satisfied it’s worth putting out there.

What else do you do, other than write?
I also work as a software developer, at least until I get a movie deal, lol. I occasionally do some editing and/or proofreading for others as well.

What other jobs have you had in your life?
I did the obligatory stints in grocery and fast food in high school and college, along with a summer of putting up sheet metal siding. After college, I moved to Las Vegas and worked in casinos for a six years. Then back to Missouri where I took over a family health food store for a few years. After that, I worked for a door and window manufacturer, first in the glass shop, then as a factory order writer, then a Special Projects AutoCAD draftsman, before ending up in the IT department as an RPGLE programmer.

If you could study any subject at university what would you pick?  
Other than writing? Probably psychology. I took a psych class my first year in college and thought it was interesting, but that wasn’t my major, so that was the only class I took on that subject.

If you could live anywhere in the world where would it be?
I’m actually pretty happy where I’m at, but I would love to visit Scotland someday and have some authentic haggis in a pub.

How do you write – laptop, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk?  
I still use a PC for my writing. If I go somewhere on vacation, I’ll move the docs to my laptop, but at home I use the PC. I know some writers feel more connected when they write by hand. I’ve tried it (had to one year when I forgot my laptop’s power cord), but I just prefer a keyboard.

How much sleep do you need to be your best?
I used to be able to function on five hours or so. Anything more than six or seven and I’d drag throughout the day. That was in my 20s and 30s. Now, I need at least seven to keep from being foggy-headed the next day.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you?
Well, beyond the obvious answers of writing full-time and being debt-free, my idea of a really successful writing career would allow me to use my income to help others in need and/or to help revitalize our small town. J. K. Rowling money would do it, right?

If you could have a dinner party and invite anyone dead or alive, who would you ask?
These “who would you invite” questions are not as easy as they sound. I had to think about this for a while because there are SO many figures from history who would be fascinating to speak with. Okay, assuming the language barrier is magically removed, I’ll start with (from the past) Nikola Tesla, although he’d have to severely dumb down practically everything he might say. Then add Jules Verne, Mark Twain and Isaac Asimov. From the (currently) living, I suppose Henry Cavill, Liev Schreiber, Elizabeth Mitchell, and Bree Turner (the living are all actors I’d ask to be in the movie based on Jaben’s Rift, lol).

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax?
I read, I’m guilty of a bit of binge-watching science fiction series, and PC gaming.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?
I mainly want people to be able to get away from the world and its problems for a while. If I can make them smile or give them something (hopefully encouraging) to think about, so much the better. I just want them to enjoy their time in the worlds I create.