An Interview with Author Gary Tubbs

Gary Tubbs is the author of Mindful Messages for Children (2016) and A Boy Like Me (2020). Taming the Dragon: My Memoir of Coming Out, Addiction, and Awakening is his first published work. A former Seattle school principal, Gary is blissfully retired and residing in Bali, Indonesia.

Where are you from?

I was born in conservative, rural eastern Washington State but lived in Seattle for 25 years as a school administrator before retiring and living as an expat in beautiful Bali, Indonesia

Why do you write? 

I write to share my story as I believe it can benefit others. I want to contribute to the healing of those who struggle with relationships, identity, and self-acceptance.

What do you write about? 

I write about my life and the lessons I have learned over seventy years or introspection and deep work. I write in a style that is authentic, raw, honest, and vulnerable.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Others tell me I am brutally honest in my writing; courageous in sharing my imperfections and mistakes as I invite others to join me along my path and my return to authenticity.

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

My greatest obstacle was a fear of not being good enough. I compared my writing to others. Once I shut down those negative voices, I relaxed into my own voice and found the confidence to persevere.

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

The following two reviews resonate deeply within me. Both are from people I don’t even know, making them even more poignant for some reason:

“Pages into this raw and honest book I wondered if I would be able to read it. And yet, little Gary already had me at the heart strings knowing all he wanted was his father’s love and approval. Turn after turn of page the honesty drew me further in. Before I knew it, I couldn’t put it down. I had to know what happened next, all the while hoping for Gary to find the love he so desired. I followed Gary through the highs and the lows of his heterosexual marriage, his encounters with men as he explored who he was and who he felt he was supposed to be. My mind and heart battled as I felt myself question my own beliefs, Christian upbringing, and a desire for all to have the love they deserve. More importantly I wanted Gary to love himself. Grab a coffee, curl up with a blanket and read this book. I finished it in three days, it was that well written, honest, real and raw.”

“Regardless of what you struggle with in life, Tubbs has tapped into the common blindness we all face with our personal issues. Through his journey, we discover that we all have the ability to overcome ourselves and find peace. You may not identify with the circumstances of his life and identity, but you will relate to his struggle, which is universal. The book is a well-written catharsis that keeps the reader hooked and Tubbs is masterful at taking you by the hand to look back on ghosts of his past. Recommend!”

How long have you been writing?

I engaged in grant writing and other technical writing for many years as a school administrator. But narrative writing is new to me. In an attempt to build skill and confidence, I became part of The Narrative Project (thenarrativeproject.net) for a year. I then self-published a collection of short stories based on childhood memories: A Boy Like Me, 2020. Taming the Dragon, 2022 is my first book with a publisher.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

Three years ago, riding on the back of my husband’s motorbike, I had a delightfully jolting thought that resonated deeply: “Write stories based on childhood memories to give to Mom for her 94th birthday.” A year later, A Boy Like Me, was born with the very first copy placed in the hands of my beloved mother on her birthday. Mom died one year later.

What do you think makes a good story?

For me a good story moves along at a pace and keeps my attention. I want there to be depth, humor, and enough stimulation to keep me engaged so that I’m not only feeling entertained but also relating to the book in a personal way.

Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as a JOY and passion. I write when I’m compelled to write or when I feel a thought, an idea, or a story bubbling up inside me that needs to be written down and saved, perhaps shared—maybe with one person, maybe a group, or to a wider audience. Should that writing evolve into a book, great! But I do not feel I am a writer. I am a vessel, willing to let a thought, story, or book be written through me.

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

Thank you for taking the journey with me from childhood to my golden years. May you be blessed with feeling all the feels this memoir might conjure up. May your heart swell with compassion for yourself and people you love, especially those suffering from identity issues, addiction, or a lack of acceptance from societal norms. Together we awaken!

Advertisement

An Author Interview with O’Cyrus

O’Cyrus is an author, poet, and writer. O’Cyrus published his first book titled, “Sacred” (poetry) on October 31, 2022. O’Cyrus has six books set to release throughout year 2023 with one graphic novel set to release in the second quarter of 2024. For more information about O’Cyrus, please visit his website at https://www.ocyrusink.com

Where are you from?

Originally born in Boston, Massachusetts. As a child my siblings and I moved around several times due to my father serving in the Military. We call it, “Military Brat” which just means growing up in a Military household. With that said, I can’t claim any place in particular, however, my wife, Melissa, would swear I am from Georgia since I spent many years there.

Why do you write? 

I want to touch the souls of readers in a world where social media has redirected the eyes off a book and onto their cellphones and computer screens. I want to touch those with my stories and change their perspective on life and fulfilment. My poetry is aimed to have me reach my hand in your bodies, grip a hold of your soul, and bring that soul into my world to allow everyone to hear the stories of many who want to help make life happier. I write stories that I would want to read and hope that others would lose themselves in like watching a movie in the movie theater. I write because I love the art and creativity of storytelling.

What do you write about? 

What an awesome question! I’d like to first start with the genres I write which is poetry, children’s books, graphic novels, and young adult suspense/thrillers. I’ve also written a romance book, but I wouldn’t say that’s my go to like the other genres I’ve mentioned. As for what I write about, it depends on the genre. Poetry, I write from the perspective of those who I have encountered throughout my years who I feel have stories worth sharing to the world. Children’s books I like to write adventure stories with a hint of suspense. I also tend to write my stories as though everything is happening in real time. For example, if you go out with your family to the amusement park I would write the adventure in a way that happens from start to finish like watching a movie. My graphic novels verge more on adventures as well with many action sequences. My young adult suspense/thriller stories verge more on psychological thrillers like mystery books.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I’ve been told my writing style is considered, “pantser.” For those who may be unaware what that means, it simply means the writer writes without much to prepare for outside of a plot. For example, let’s say I want to write about a coconut that is trying to locate it’s family because that coconut fell from a coconut tree near the ocean and was washed, but washed up on another island. Now I’d take that coconut, and turn that coconut into a character, let’s say the coconut is a young 7-year-old boy who was in the coconut tree sleeping with a coconut that were siblings. That night they were sleeping, and a group of human teenagers went to that tree, shook it until a coconut fell, but due to the ocean’s current the teenagers ran away meanwhile the coconut stayed in the sand and thus washed away. Now the plot is for the character, to get back home. I don’t think of other characters, nor gender, names, or much of anything as I will simply go where the story takes me.

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

Well, I work full time in the Military so, that along with parenting comes with its own challenges. For the most part, I try to do things between 3am-6am as many days out of the week.

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work? “Wow! I didn’t expect that to happen at all!”

How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing since childhood. Maybe 5 or 6 years old, however it was off and on, but the idea to really hone in on my writing continued to present itself to me consistently since childhood.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

This became a reality in late 2021 when I was home on parental leave and was reading stories to my children and thought, “you know, I would love to read my own books to my children,” so I told my wife literally the next day, “babes, I’m going to write a children’s book.” She was caught off guard but supported me. About 2 weeks later I wrote the book, then hired an illustrator which was my sister who is a professional illustrator, then hired an editor and thus the bug to write stories has been ever growing since.

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

3am-6am is the time where I will help keep my home maintained since my wife does a great deal of maintenance with our home while I am at work. I will also take about 30 minutes to read a chapter of a book. Recently I’ve been reading Manga’s. Generally, 4am-6am is writing time which could include research of areas I’d like to write about. Then from 6am-7am I will exercise. Afterwards I would get ready for work, write my wife a good morning text, and that’s my morning cycle.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Hmmmm…I’d say I have to use a specific type of keyboard to type my stories. The type of keyboard that each key on it sticks out like a typewriter where I can physically feel each key press into the keyboard. None of that flat keyboard mess where the button is so flat I forget where the keys are and ESPECIALLY not using a keyboard that have different keys in different areas of the keyboard. That gives me anxiety.

How long does it take to write a book?

Depends on the genre. Children’s books could range from one day to two weeks depending on if the book is a board book for ages 0-3 where the page count is generally ten pages or if it’s a picture book for children ages 2-8 where the page count is roughly 24-32 pages. Now if we’re talking poetry books, I’d say 3 months maybe even 4 months. Graphic novels can take me 4-6 months to write just due to me also sketching my scenes out before hiring an illustrator.

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

Write, write, write! I also highly recommend reading books specifically under the genre you as the writer have an interest in. I used to hear, “to become a better writer, it is important to read all the time,” but that’s not necessarily true in my experience. I know that I love images in my stories much like going to a restaurant and the menu has images of the food they have. Take that same logic, go to a restaurant, and go to order from a menu that doesn’t have any images, just words. I lose my mind because I feel I need pictures to help shape my story. I say all of this because yes, it is important to read as much as possible, but knowing what to read will excel how much more you read because you have an interest in it. So, in short, write and read daily.

What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story? Sometimes I’ve stumbled on how to open the story but HANDS DOWN the most challenging part of creating a story for me is the ending. Writing the ending. As I mentioned earlier, I am considered a “pantser,” which means I don’t know what the ending of my own story is until it happens. Because things are so situationally based with my writing style, I am often writing several endings until my wife picks out the best one that makes since for the story.

What do you think makes a good story?

Plot easily and the outcome of the plot. I don’t think having action in a story just to have action in it has any value unless the action occurring is specific to the situation of the character. Fighting just to fight doesn’t make sense to me. Fighting because the character was placed in a situation that led to that fight to me has far more value. A good story is one that flows from beginning, middle, and end. It’s very difficult to do even as an author myself, but if you believe in your stories than others will also.

What does your family think of your writing? 

They love that I am living through my gift as a writer and progressing with that. My wife, Melissa, has been instrumental in supporting me. She spent many mornings sleeping by herself because I woke up so early to write. She means everything to me. My son also loves that I am a writer and I love when he comes downstairs and says, “Papa, are you working on your story?” My parents and siblings are overjoyed with excitement for me as well.

Do you see writing as a career?

Oh yes! Without question! This is what I want to do for the rest of my life is tell stories whether in books, movies, or even in theatre.

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

Thank you everyone for supporting me and for those who are new to my content. I am grateful for your time, and I hope you that we grow together, and my audience expands. I want to touch the souls of the world with my storytelling. I don’t have a social media account, but I do have a website as for those who want to stay connected with me. www.ocyrusink.com      

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Officially, I called myself a writer in November 2021.

 My website: www.ocyrusink.com

An Interview with Author A D Bollen

Tell me a bit about yourself and what you do?

My name is Alex and I am an Australasian author based in Queensland Australia. I am the author of, A Succession of Swords, book one in The Chronicles of Serenity series. I come from a construction background, and was the founder of a large tiling company, before stepping back to focus on my passions. I am a huge family person, who is content to sit at home and argue with my children, over who is the strongest avenger. (Obviously Hulk!)

What is A Succession of Swords about?

A Succession of Swords is book one in The Chronicles of Serenity. It is an adult dark fantasy series that takes place in a world filled with orcs, elves and demonspawn, and the main characters are the gods and rulers of this world. In Serenity, The Sentinels of the Gods rule for a thousand years, before passing the rule down to their children. The story begins on the day the new Sentinels are to be named. Characters are not what they seem, and betrayal is almost certain.

What makes the world of Serenity unique?

I have strived to establish a world and characters that feel real. Although they are the gods, I wanted to dive deep into their human characteristics. The feelings and motivations that drive them, the positive and negative traits that hold them back, or push them to succeed. Every character faces their own unique trials, and handles the events in their own way. (Some better than others)

What are your inspirations?

I have always been a huge fan of fantasy, and love the escape element to the genre. (A world where the impossible is possible) I also find inspiration in people, people are very interesting creatures. Why does someone do what they do? Why does someone want what they want? I find these questions very interesting, and the truth is everybody is different, which makes the subject even more intriguing.

Do you have any favourite characters?

Definitely! Three of the characters are actually based on older versions of my children, however I spend a lot of time creating my characters and I am fond of all of them. (Even the naughty ones)

What is next for you as an author?

BOOK 2! I am very happy to announce that I have started working on the early chapters of book two. I will keep everyone up to date on my progress, through my website www.adbollen.com and my social media accounts.

An Interview with Author Kerron Tomlinson

Kerron Tomlinson (Morgan) grew up in Jamaica West Indies. Her parents were ministers and were assigned to many parishes to serve. She remembers her early life as one that saw the family moving house at least eight times as her parents took on new assignments.

Kerron read almost incessantly, and wrote short stories from the time she was in primary (elemantary) school.

When she went on to college,she was encouraged by her Literature teacher, Mrs Neil, to consider writing as a career. However, with the limitations of the time, she wrote , because she had to satisfy the urge to write. She wrote a short play ” Run Bredda Rat,” for the drama group from Manning’s School in the 1980s. The drama group entered the Jamaica Cultural Development Competition and won a silver medal.

In the early 2000s she was delighted to see a Literary Arts supplement of The Jamaica Observer, that published short stories, essays and poems. This gave her the opprtunity of having her stories published.

She also entered the short story competition of the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission competition in 2006, and won an award.

Kerron is now working on the another novel in the “It’s Own Time,” series.

Kerron has one child, Verrden Morgan, and five siblings.

  • Where are you from?

I am from the island of Jamaica, West Indies

  • Why do you write? 

Writing is innate to me. I am most excited when I’m creating a whole new world from words.

  • What do you write about? 

Stories about people, how we relate to each other… how we navigate this journey called life, are fulfilling to write. I also write about the effect of the unseen world, on the ‘seen’ world the forces that battle against good and evil, in   our lives.

  • Do you have a specific writing style?

My style of writing is primarily narrative and descriptive.

  • What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

Sometimes, no matter how you write and refine your draft, your story seems stuck. It’s as if there is another story that is somewhere in the subconscious that needs to be told. So, my greatest obstacle can be writing an outline or a pitch. On the other hand, it can be a great tool too.

  • What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

“I didn’t want the story to end.” ‘When is the next book?” ‘Are you going to write more about character  so and so?”

  • How long have you been writing?

I have been writing since I was about ten years old, and have been an avid reader from the age of six.

  •  When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

I always knew I was a writer. I was always writing, and doing music.

  • What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

I would wake at about 4:00 a.m. and do at least an hour of writing.  Make breakfast for the family before 5:30. Do a high-intensity run on the treadmill from 5:30-6:00.

Get ready to go teach high school music and be out of the house by 7:30 So that type of scheduling took much organization during the weekends. Now, my son goes off to school…I’m on leave because of an illness that led to paraplegia. My focus is on being in a good place mentally, then on the writing process.

  • What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Not following the draft/outline;, letting the story develop organically.

  • How long does it take to write a book?

For me writing a book takes sometimes up to a year, sometimes a few months.

  • Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

Yes. Read, read, and then read some more. Studying the classics in college under the guidance of a great literature instructor really helped me.

  • What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story?

There’s usually a struggle about whom the characters will become, and what crisis they have to face. How do I make the characters’ issues resonate with the reader?

  • What do you think makes a good story?

Usually, stories in which good, and love triumph over greed, selfishness, meanness…you know, that sort of thing. Also, stories with strong positive family values.

  • What does your family think of your writing? 

They’ve been fans from day one. My family is filled with creatives. They all read voraciously.

  • Do you see writing as a career?

At this point- yes. Before technology changed the world, living on my tiny island meant my access to international agents, publishing houses etc. was a long struggle it didn’t seem I was about to win. So I still wrote and had stories published in a national newspaper the  Jamaica Observer Arts Section. I also entered Arts competitions and did well. To make a career from creative writing under those circumstances, however, seemed just a dream

  • Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

Pursue your God-given passion

Live Interview with Author Dot IkwerreGirl Acheru

A trained linguist and Certified Project Manager, Dot IkwerreGirl Acheru is an embodiment of resilience. Her inner strength gives her the impetus to go out and help other women who had walked the path she had threaded and conquered. As a Humanitarian, she sees to the needs of the less privileged and provides help to the broken to the best of her ability. Her writing skill has birthed countless didactic posts on Social Media as well as this open-hearted narrative. Dot, who is a founder of a supportive club for B.A.M.E women in London, is a mother of two adorable kids.

Author Live Chat with Fans https://www.facebook.com/events/659596492291504
Sunday: Real-Life Inspiring Stories
13th November 2022 8PM CST on Facebook page (International Book Promotion)

Author Dot IkwerreGirl Acheru
The Impacts of Domestic Violence

About the Author:
A trained linguist and Certified Project Manager, Dot IkwerreGirl Acheru is an embodiment of resilience. Her inner strength gives her the impetus to go out and help other women who had walked the path she had threaded and conquered. As a Humanitarian, she sees to the needs of the less privileged and provides help to the broken to the best of her ability. Her writing skill has birthed countless didactic posts on Social Media as well as this open-hearted narrative. Dot, who is a founder of a supportive club for B.A.M.E women in London, is a mother of two adorable kids.

https://www.talk2dot.com/
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0BHFD7Q3D/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0

https://www.facebook.com/events/659596492291504

Describe yourself in five words

Intelligent, Energetic, Creative, resourceful, and Pleasant

What fact about yourself would really surprise people?

I am really shy 🙂

How do you work through self-doubts and fear? 

I focus on my strengths; other times, I give into my fears and doubts because it is good to be vulnerable and feel things as I experience them.What scares you the most? Aging. I fear the inevitable old age, as we cannot predict how we will age. I fear that age when I am vulnerable and totally dependent on others for my care and basic needs.

What makes you happiest?

My Children. Seeing how far they have come and blossomed makes it all worth it.

Why do you write?

I write to express myself and give my readers hope and knowledge. I like to proffer solutions. I hope that my story can be someone’s survival guide.

Have you always enjoyed writing? 

Yes, I’ve always enjoyed writing articles and funny stories. It comes naturally to me, What motivates you to write? I get challenged by situations I find myself and even situations of others. The urge to shine a light for others.

What writing are you most proud of?

Silent Watchers is my first indie published book. What are you most proud of in your personal life? I am proud of myself for never quitting or giving up, regardless of what life may have thrown at me.

What books did you love growing up?

To Sir with Love by E. R. Braithwaite, adventure novels by James Hadley Chase, I wasn’t a great reader, though.

What do you hope your obituary will say about you?

That I was a fantastic person and an inspiration to many, a hope for the hopeless, and a game changer with a dash of crazy humour.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing; tell us where you grew up and where you now live.

I grew up in Nigeria and later relocated and naturalised in the U.K. Nearly two decades ago.

How did you develop your writing?

I have a creative mind, which makes writing easy for me. It all starts with an idea, and then I begin to expand on it.

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing?

Marketing! Most definitely marketing. You can have an amazing work, but people must see and read it. You’ll have to have good enough reviews to validate your work. So definitely marketing.

What marketing works for you?

Social media is fantastic. The good thing is that I have a sizeable following, which facilitates getting the word out there. However, I have had to work out of my circle with other social media influencers and marketers to expand my reach.

Do you find it hard to share your work? 

Not really. Sharing isn’t difficult; getting people to respond to the content. Now that’s the tricky bit.

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you?

My children are very proud of me; my daughter (6 years old, by the way) kept on my case, reminding me to keep writing. My mother has been a pillar! I also have very supportive friends and colleagues; I feel blessed for that too.

What else do you do, other than write?

I’m a project manager, and I also run Community Clubs that support women who have experienced Domestic violence and ongoing financial difficulties. Every year for the past four years, I have also carried out outreach programs to single mothers and widows in Nigeria, providing food, clothing, and money for business start-ups.

What other jobs have you had in your life?

Hmmm… I’ve been around the block, trying to find my passion, and I’m still on that journey. So, I’ve worked as a bi-lingual translator, Documents controller in the Oil and Gas industry, and Project manager for UK Public Sector, and believe it out not; I have also worked as a Catering assistant serving up meals and a security officer/ bouncer 🙂

If you could study any subject at university, what would you pick?

I’ve done quite a lot of studying in my life, and I am not sure I want anymore, But criminology and profiling have always interested me. I’m also looking to bag a certification as a life coach soon.

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?

I would love to live on a private island in Fiji, drinking milk out of coconut  and eating roasted fish and salad every day while listening to “Don’t worry be happy” by Bob Marley and getting a massage three times a week.

Tell us about your family?

It’s just myself and my two children, a son, and a daughter; they are my battery source; they keep me going, and I feel validated every time I look at them.

I come from a nuclear family of 6. My dad, my mum, two brothers and a sister. I am the youngest of four. Sadly, my dad passed last year. I wish he was here to witness my first book. I know he would have been proud.

How do you write – lap top, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk?

It’s a mix, really. Sometimes I make voice notes; I may be in the kitchen and get thoughts, so I scribble on a piece of paper or tissue, whatever is available to collate my thoughts. I type primarily at night, when the house is quiet. 80% of the time I’m on my sofa, laptop on my lap typing away. And then I wonder why I have back pains.. hahaha

How much sleep do you need to be your best?

At least 4hours, but I’d be lying to say I ever get that much…lol

Is there anyone you’d like to acknowledge and thank for their support?

I want to recognize my friends Yvonne Egbuna; I’ve known her since 1996, she was help when I needed to get out of a dire situation, and she has never stopped checking up on me. Annet Mugaga I met in Uni while studying for an M.A. in management at the Middlesex Uni London. And the list could not be complete without mentioning Joan Oruwari, Andrea Stewart, Ufuoma Aaron, and many more, too numerous to mention for constantly checking up on me and pushing me to be the best I could be.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you?

Success for me is good sales but, most importantly, positive feedback from readers. I want to get that feeling that my work changed lives.

It is vital to get exposure and target the right readers for your writing, tell us about your marketing campaign?

I have employed two marketing companies to manage my campaign as I feel a bit of professionality would go a long way. I have a vast social media following that helps. I also work alongside individual social media influencers and promoters. Just about anything to create a buzz, really.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it? 

I wrote the book Silent Watchers as a solution for those going through domestic violence. Using my situation as an example, my hope is that it becomes a wake-up call for many. This book highlights the impact of Children Witnessing Domestic Violence. Parents often, especially mothers, will stay in a toxic relationship because of their children. However, my book shows how detrimental and damaging that choice is to a child. Also, many people don’t know they are in an abusive relationship because of the absence of physical violence; this book breaks down domestic abuse and highlights the non-violent aspects of it that are usually overlooked. A definite must-read. 🙂

If you could have a dinner party and invite anyone dead or alive, who would you ask?

Whitney Houston, there’s just something about her voice that gives me goosebumps. And, of course, she’d have to sing to me…lol. Also my great grand father, the King Amakwe, he has something I need…lol

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax?

Listen to music, make creative funny skits, and have family time with my kids. We like to travel, try out new things, and see the world.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

The words in my books are hard-hitting… lot’s of emotions, anger, tears, pain, and then hope. I hope my book is an eye-opener to my readers and hopefully a wake-up call. Also, with determination, they can survive anything.

Catch up with the author here

Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ikwerregirl
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/talk2dot
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/talk2dot
Twitter: https://twitter.com/talk2dot
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/talk2dot

Author Interview with Roy T Martin

Roy T Martin’s journey into the literary world started in the third grade where he’d compete against his brother to see who could create better storlines. From there he would continue to conjure up countless stories from historical fiction to romances. It wasn’t until his junior year in high school he decided to pick up poetry where he could better process and express his person feelings and thoughts. After publishing some of his works through Wattpad and Instagram he would go on to publish his first official piece of literature “Poetic Signature”. Currently he’s in the process of writing his first ever light novel. Get in touch if you’ve got any comments, questions, suggestions, or just want to say hello. He would be more than happy to hear from you.

Describe yourself in five words.

I’d have to say resilient, optimistic, expressive, adventurous, and talented. 

What fact about yourself would really surprise people? 

Mainly that I am a man of many faces. Different people know me for completely different ways of being, but oddly enough they’re all me. I’m a bit of a walking contradiction, but in a good way.

How do you work through self-doubt and fear? 

Honestly, I get so anxious that I force myself to just get whatever is scaring me over with. I’m big on embracing my fear while also facing it head on.

What scares you the most? 

I feel that the answer to this question changes a lot throughout life for most people but for me personally, it’s that I disappoint myself. At the end of the day I hold myself to a high standard because when we go to whatever is after this life, I just want to know I lived it “correctly”.

What makes you happiest?

As corny as it may be…love. 

Why do you write? 

I actually have several reasons for why I write. I do this to express my inner thoughts, to give readers another point of view or perspective that may change how they see their reality, and lastly because this is my dream.

Have you always enjoyed writing?

Oddly enough, no. As a kid I loved making stories but actually writing them felt too tedious. Although it was different for me when I got into poetry. I started in either my sophomore or junior year of highschool in hopes that it would impress a girl I liked. Ultimately it worked, but when things went south the poetry kept me together.  

What motivates you to write?

Usually when I’m going through a rough patch the poems just flow for me. 

What writing are you most proud of?

Pretty much all the stories and poems of my youth. I love to look back and see how far I’ve come creatively.

What are you most proud of in your personal life? 

I’m most proud of the fact that I in live my truth, I’m just unapologetically me.

What books did you love growing up? 

Going all the way back to grade school I loved anything that taught me about animals and different time periods. I was also a big fan of biology and Greek mythology.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live? 

I come from Reading, Pennsylvania. Pretty much I grew up around a bunch of tallent, but also a major shortage of hope. It pushed me to want more from life and to believe in myself despite the odds. As for where I live now, I reside in Arizona. Don’t get me wrong, I still love Reading but the slower pace out here suits me just fine.

How did you develop your writing?

I just stared young and always prioritized that I felt my emotions. I was never one to numb myself and that helped to get the most out of my imagination.

Do you find it hard to share your work? 

Even now I’m still a little shy about sharing my poems, but that’s changing rather quickly.

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you? 

Of course, my family is my rock when it comes to my career. As for friends, a handful of my old classmates still show love when it comes to my writing, but I’ve found more support amongst the local groups in my area. They gave me everything from words of experience to supplies and connections. One author even helped me to get my first book signing opportunity that’s coming up in December.

What else do you do, other than write? 

I like to practice martial arts and even though it’s been awhile, I used to play the saxophone.

How do you write – laptop, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk? 

I like to draft out ideas with a paper and pencil, then finalize everything on either my chromebook or my phone. As for where, it’s really wherever inspiration strikes.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you? 

As long as I’ve made a positive impact in the lives of my readers and I can afford to live comfortably and support my loved ones, I’d say that’s all the success I need.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?  

I’m glad you asked about it. My latest book “Poetic Signature: The Deluxe Edition” is a more complete version of my first ever published work “Poetic Signature”. I was going through a rough time mentally and felt like I had to channel those feelings and then boom. I think the best part is that it brings together two separate stages in my life and shows how I’ve matured.

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax? 

These days, when I’m not typing away I’m either playing basketball or binge watching shows like there’s no tomorrow.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

From what I’ve been told, my works inspire self reflection. I’m hoping readers use that introspection to see life differently and that they strive to be their most happy and authentic selves.

Do you have links that you’d like to share for others to read?

You can find more of me at my website https://www.rtmpublishing.com/ and my latest book “Poetic Signature: The Deluxe Edition” is out now on Amazon too.

Author Interview with Spencer Russell Smith

Spencer Russell Smith is a graduate of Boston University, where he studied music composition, and the author of the breakout Awakening the Lightforged Trilogy. He is an avid reader of the Sci-fi and Fantasy genres. When he is not reading, writing, or composing music, he is probably being dragged down the street on a “walk” (full sprint) by his stumpy rescue dog, Cabo. He makes his online home at www.spencerrussellsmith.com. You can connect with Spencer on Twitter @SRSmithAuthor, on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/spencerrussellsmithauthor, find his music at spencerrussellsmith.com/music, and you should send him an email at mail at spencerrussellsmith.com if the mood strikes you!

Where are you from?

  • I grew up just outside Los Angeles, CA, but now I live in Massachusetts with my wife.

Why do you write? 

  • Mainly because I just have stories inside me that I need to tell. I also write because reading has always helped me see the world and the people in it from new perspectives and helped make me a much more open-minded person. I hope that my writing will do the same for others.

What do you write about? 

  • The main genre I write in is Epic Fantasy, but within that, I write about characters, cultures and topics that interest me, or that I want to learn more about. I find the process of getting into a character’s head (especially if they are nothing like me) fascinating, and I love researching history, language, and different cultures to draw from in my writing.

Do you have a specific writing style?

  • I try to be as deep in the character’s head as I can, but never write in first person. Though I do aim to give my prose beauty in certain spots, I tend to write in a very simplistic manner. My goal is to effectively convey what is going on to the reader, and though more flowery prose has its place, I often find that it gets in the way, especially if, for example, I wanted to highlight just how gruesome certain aspects of war or even isolated violence can be.

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

  • My day job is the biggest obstacle. When I wake up at 4 or 5am in the morning, I get astounding amounts of writing done. When I wake up at a more normal time, it’s a bit harder. Research is also a big obstacle, as I want to make sure that whether I am drawing from a particular culture, or writing about specific social issues or a type of mental illness, I don’t want the end result to be surface-level or reduced to a stereotype.

What’s the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

  • There are three that really stick with me. The first is: “You can’t make this free.” I was writing a companion novella (at least, it was supposed to be a novella) to my debut trilogy Awakening the Lightforged, to give to my mailing-list for free as an exclusive “Thank you” for signing up. My wife is wonderful enough to help me with my initial review process when writing, and at a few different points while reading it, she told me it was too good to give away for free. By that point, it was long enough to be considered a novel, so I agreed with her.

The second and third were from my editor’s feedback.

  • “Awakening the Lightforged…is reminiscent of the works of Brandon Sanderson in its well realised magic system and well-structured worldbuilding.”
  • “The sensitivity with which you handle the same-sex relationship…is a credit to your story. That the same-sex relationships are as strong as any of the heterosexual relationships we encounter…show a depth of understanding and a desire to have wider representation within fiction itself.”

How long have you been writing?

  • I started writing little fictional stories for myself when I was 12, but I didn’t seriously start writing until I was about 14, attempting to publish my first book when I was 16. I didn’t publish it, but I learned a lot from the process. I took a break from writing in college to focus on school, but after that, came back with renewed focus, and a drive to constantly improve my writing ever since.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

  • I will always cite my first viewing of Peter Jackson’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy as what put me on this path. Christopher Paolini’s publishing of Eragon also helped me see that it was possible to start writing and write something people wanted to read at such a young age, but seeing something as amazing as “The Lord of the Rings” sent me diving into Tolkien’s work and the world of writing. I even wrote my college essay on how “The Lord of the Rings” changed my life.

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

  • It varies. I have a day job, so I try to get most of my writing done before my work day starts. If I can’t, I’ll use my lunch break to get a bit of writing done. Sometimes I’ll do a bit of editing or admin work after I’m done with my day job, but usually I’m a bit mentally exhausted by that point, so I try not to do anything then to make sure I can trust the quality. When I’m writing, I’m usually working on 3 different projects at a given time, with one or two of those being prep work for a future project. That way, I can switch between projects if I get a bit fatigued on one. I aim for about 3 hours of writing per day, and track my word counts. 2 of those hours are usually devoted to prose, with the remaining one devoted to outlining. On a good day, a full three hours usually means about 4000 words of prose and 3000 words of outlining. I usually average just over two hours of writing a day, as sometimes I won’t be as focused as I would like, or life gets in the way, but I wrote 1 million words last year, and I’m hoping to do the same or better this year.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

  • That I over-outline and plan WAY in advance. Seriously. My outlines are sometimes as long as my actual novels, but it’s something that works for me. Also, planning things so far out in advance. Though I can “force” a story if needed, I don’t like the process, and it leaves me a bit exhausted and less excited to write. If I plan things out in advance, I can work on them bit by bit over time to help keep myself from burning out, I can make sure I know where my story or series is going before I start writing the first words of the draft, and I have more time to refine the story, characters, and world. Because of this, I have more outlines for books than I will be able to write in a lifetime, and I know how many books I should have done in five years’ time (A LOT) and what I should be working on at that time.

How long does it take to write a book?

  • That’s a complicated question. I tried pantsing or discovery writing when I was younger. It didn’t work that well, and I spent a year writing a fifteen-chapter book, with incredible amounts of “writer’s block” popping up to halt my progress. Mild outlining after that resulted in a lot of editing, which was not a process I enjoyed.

    Now, I am a heavy outliner. For one book I wrote that ended up being about 90,000 words, the full outline was about 86,000 words. So about 45 hours of writing prose, and about 29 hours of outlining. However, that outlining was done at a leisurely pace, getting a little bit in over the course of a few months, which really gave me time to think about the story and the characters and make some significant changes each time I revisited it that improved the story. The last 19,000 words of the outline were my scene drafts, which I did in a week, and because of all that outlining, I knew my story so well that I completed the first draft in two weeks of writing. After that, I took a few days to go through it, write out the questions for my wife to review, and then once she gave me her feedback, it took another three or four days to incorporate that, and once I got my editor’s feedback, it took only a few hours to review and incorporate his advice. That resulted in a 90,000 word novel I was proud of, written in less than a month. It honestly has taken me more time to format the book and produce some of the art to go with it than it did to edit that novel.

    At the other end of the spectrum: I needed a new reader-magnet after I decided I would sell the companion novel rather than giving it away for free. That reader-magnet ended up being a 21,000 word novella. It took me a month to outline, write, and edit it. Maybe that’s still pretty fast, but it didn’t seem so at the time for a work of that size.

    After all that rambling, it probably takes me about two months to write a novel that is around 100,000 words, though I stretch that first month out to make sure I don’t get burned out, and that I have more time to think about the story and the characters.

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

  • Write. Do it every day. For at least five minutes. The more you write, the better and the faster you will become. Watch YouTube videos on writing and story analysis. Not the ones that say “Writing tips” or “How to write a book” but the ones like SavageBooks and Lessons From the Screenplay and Hello Future Me that examine why stories work or didn’t work, and learn from those. Study the craft of story and writing. Prose deserves some study, but not as much as most people give it. You need to learn structure, what tropes are and how to use them, the beats of your chosen genre, and how to market your book. That last one will make you a better writer even if you choose to traditionally publish, as it makes you think about your story in a different way than you’re used to.

What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story?

  • Research, making sure I get enough/good enough sleep to wake up early and write, narrowing down the scope and focus of my writing, the tiny setting details, ensuring that I don’t just write the same characters and arcs over and over again, and ensuring that I can keep everything focused and consistent through the longer works like I’m writing now.

What do you think makes a good story?

  • For me, it’s all about the characters, which I think is true for a lot of people. Most plots have been done before in one way or another, and when someone can come up with a really good plot twist or a new spin on an old trope, that is fantastic, but it’s the character and the character’s journey that really does it for me. At the end of Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time series, there are incredible battles and some truly epic moments. But one of the scenes that brought me to tears was a man learning to laugh and to hope again after all he’s been through, rather than a character doing something really cool with magic or snapping victory from the jaws of defeat.
  • Also, structure. I know a lot of people think structure is “cheating” or “formulaic”, but they need to get over that. Structure won’t make a good story by itself, but it can do a lot of the heavy lifting. Learn structure inside and out. Once you’ve written a few books following the structure to a T and know it inside and out, then you can start breaking the “rules” and playing around with the structure of your story.

What does your family think of your writing? 

  • None of them read fantasy, and my mom has dyslexia so the names are hard for her, but she and my grandma have both read my short story and love it, and my dad and my uncle have started on my novella and novel and like them a lot. My mom and my sister are probably my best marketers, and take the book with them everywhere, telling everyone about it. My wife and I get calls from my father-in-law daily asking “What’s the name of Spencer’s book again? Throne of (something)? Throne of Darkness? Thanks, bye.” Both my own and my wife’s side of the family have been nothing but supportive, and my wife is my biggest supporter. She challenges me to be better and interrupts her own reading schedule to read my books and essentially acts as an editor for them. (After my wife goes through the book and I incorporate her feedback, my editor has had very few remarks to give).

Do you see writing as a career?

  • Yes. Most artistic careers like writing that a lot of people see as a pipe dream seem to favor those who stick it out and put in the work. While I would love to have Brandon Sanderson or George R. R. Martin-levels of success, a successful career as an author to me just means that I make enough from writing that I can quit my day job and have more time to write. I do hope I hit that point soon, though, because I have so many stories I want to write that I’m genuinely uncertain if I will be able to finish them all in my lifetime.

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

  • Book 2 comes out on October 31st, 2022, and there are many, many more to come! If you enjoy my work, please leave a review, post about it on social media, tell everyone you know who you think might like my writing, etc. so that I have more time to write, and can get you more books even faster!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

  • I first considered myself a writer after I completed my first book in 2009. It wasn’t a good book, but it was a finished project that I had completed, and I felt like writing was something I could really do. I first felt like an author back in 2017 when I posted some short stories online under a pen name and people wanted more.

Links:

Author Interview with M. Declan Morris

M. Declan Morris is the author of the Afterlife Quest novels. Fantasy books where your favorite characters are already dead! No need to lose sleep fretting about when the author will kill them off.

Declan has a passion for helping people and a heart for people who are struggling with mental wellness.

Before he started writing novels, he earned a Master’s degree in Management and Leadership which is where he picked up his love of psychological safety and wellness in the workplace. This naturally broadened into all facets of mental wellness outside of the office and sparked his passion.

Declan’s novels have an undercurrent of helping people process their trauma and know that they are not alone. As an example, the Theodore Saga in the Afterlife Quest series of novels will each cover one of the stages of grief.

His best advice, besides have fun reading his books, is to always know that there is help available and you don’t have to go it alone.

Why do you write?

I started writing because I had an idea to write a series of fantasy novels where each book in the series was based on one of the stages of grief. I have a passion for people’s mental wellness and I think that easy-to-read stories with ways to help process grief and trauma might help people.

Have you always enjoyed writing?

I had never attempted writing fiction before, but over the last year, I have fallen in love with writing fiction. My creativity really has an outlet and anything can happen.

What motivates you to write?

I want to continue writing because I love people and if one of my books can help even one person through a tough time, it was all worth it.

What writing are you most proud of?

I absolutely love my first two novels, but I am really proud of the third novel in the Theodore Saga. He is on a pirate ship and battling pirates almost the whole book and I have had a lot of fun and made myself laugh a few times while writing it.

What are you most proud of in your personal life?

Probably of how much my young kids care for others. They don’t just say they care, they show that they care with their actions.

What books did you love growing up?

I have always loved reading about psychology, philosophy, and history as far back as I can remember.

What do you hope your obituary will say about you?

I just want people to know how much I loved them.

Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live?

I grew up in Indiana and Arizona. My family moved around quite a lot. I now live in Idaho and plan on staying here until I die.

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing?

Marketing is the most difficult for me. The other two were easy by comparison.

Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you?

Everyone has been very supportive. I think it is because they know I am trying to help people who are struggling.

What else do you do, other than write?

I am the Administrator of a retirement village in Boise, Idaho and I love work. I get to help people all day long and it never gets old.

If you could study any subject at university what would you pick?

If I could go back and do it all over again I think I would’ve studied psychology from the start. I love helping people and mental wellness is at an all-time low because of the pandemic

Tell us about your family?

I have been married for over sixteen years and have three kids ranging in age from eight to thirteen.

How do you write – laptop, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk?

Pretty much all laptop, but all of my outlines are handwritten.

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you?

If my work can help even one person work through some form of trauma or grief, or helps their mental wellness at all, it has been a success.

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?

The Stain of Guilt is the second book in my Theodore Saga. The main character dies in the first book and processes through the denial stage of grief while going on a fantasy adventure. This second book continues the story as he deals with the guilt of leaving his new bride behind. I wrote it because I still have stages of grief for him to process and because I think a great number of people are dealing with grief right now.

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

I hope people feel encouraged that they can process their trauma and grief and I hope they understand that someone cares about them. I never want anyone to feel alone in their struggle and I think connecting with a main character that is also working through things could be helpful.

An Interview with Author Dr. Ganesh Narine

Describe yourself in five words

Philosophical, thoughtful, serious-minded, focused, analytical

What fact about yourself would really surprise people? 

Funny

How do you work through self-doubts and fear? 

Look inward and staying calm

What scares you the most? 

Failure and not making a positive contribution to society

What makes you happiest? 

Being a leader of and an agent for and of positive change

Why do you write? 

I just love encouraging people to do their best at whatever they do.

 Have you always enjoyed writing? 

Yes

What motivates you to write? 

The opportunity to share experiences and to help people to remain safe.

What are you most proud of in your personal life? 

How my wife and I have made ourselves as accomplished and successful professionals. That journey was never an easy one.

What books did you love growing up? 

West Indian Novels especially those by V.S. Naipaul

 What do you hope your obituary will say about you? 

Jeez he is dead

 Location and life experiences can really influence writing, tell us where you grew up and where you now live? 

I am from Trinidad and Tobago and now live in Canada

How did you develop your writing?

My writing developed over a long 40-year career in the electric utility industry

What is hardest – getting published, writing or marketing? 

Marketing

 Is your family supportive? Do your friends support you? 

My wife is my rock. Before that it was my mother. My mother was my true foundation. Everything else was with my wife as the real support.

What else do you do, other than write? 

I love driving long distances and visiting places that way.

 What other jobs have you had in your life? 

I am a career (over 40 years) Engineer/Manager/Executive in the electric power industry. I led all major divisions and some of the largest teams in this business leading and managing major and complex projects and mitigating problems.

 If you could study any subject at university what would you pick? 

I have a Ph.D. (Leadership), MPhil (Management), MSc (Engineering), BSc (Engineering).

 If you could live anywhere in the world where would it be? 

USA

 Tell us about your family? 

My Wife and I are married for nearly 40 years now. She has a PH.D. in Education and works at a University in the Education Faculty. My son is an Electrical Engineer with a decade of working experience in the electric power industry. My daughter-in-law also has a budding career in the same industry. My sister is an MBA graduate from a university in the UK and operated as a manager for an international company in the Caribbean. She is now working in payroll management in Canada.

How do you write – lap top, pen, paper, in bed, at a desk? 

Laptop

How much sleep do you need to be your best? .

4 to 5 hours nightly

Every writer has their own idea of what a successful career in writing is, what does success in writing look like to you? 

Your inner self will lead your writing

Tell us about your new book? Why did you write it?  

This book (Electric Power Industry Accidents: We Can Learn from Them & We Can Prevent Them) contains a detailed discussion on actual workplace accidents in the electric power industry. I explore the reasons for these accidents and compares similar accidents from different places and times. The work involves an exploration of the electric power industry, the people who work there, and the work strategies, plans, and standards. It is a rare compilation of challenging issues that, if not managed, can lead to future accidents, worker injuries, and possibly deaths. I want to prevent workplace accidents and to always keep workers injury free.

If you could have a dinner party and invite anyone dead or alive, who would you ask? 

My Mother

When you are not writing, how do you like to relax? 

Driving long distances and listening to seventies pop and soul, Trinidad and Tobago local music, and a Bollywood classics

What do you hope people will take away from your writing? How will your words make them feel?

To learn how to prevent mishaps, always keep safe and injury free

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ganesh-narine-ph-d-77882b103/

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ganesh-Narine

An Interview with Author T. G. Bryant

T. G. Bryant found his love for writing when he was eight years old. He discovered the idea for “The Canvas Adventures” while looking at a gorgeous painting at a friend’s house. He felt a deep longing to help combat bullying, especially in children and teens. His book’s mission is to help others find their self-worth and purpose.

Bryant has written several other books and comedic scripts for the stage. He considers writing a cathartic hobby. His favorite authors are C. S. Lewis and Lois Lowry.

Outside of writing, Bryant enjoys performing in community theatre, particularly comedies. He and his wife live in the heart of Georgia.

Contact the author: tg.bryant at cox.net

Where are you from?

I was born and raised in Houston County, Georgia.

Why do you write? 

I write because it’s truly my favorite thing to do! I’m passionate about storytelling and creating something that is my own. I find that writing is a good escape.

What do you write about? 

The Canvas Adventures tells the story of Gabriel, an introvert, on an unexpected journey, when he is literally pushed into a magical oil canvas painting and transported into an unfamiliar world.

Do you have a specific writing style?

I am in my mid-thirties, but I still believe in longhand writing. I write out a list of ideas. That list becomes sentences, and those sentences become paragraphs, and so on. I find that writing it out with a pen and paper is part of the style that makes my writing unique. I then take those notes (which are often, very messy) and type them up. It’s also a chance to fix things that may not make sense.

What are obstacles that come in the way of writing? 

Any writer will tell you – writers block is the first thing that always gets in the way of finishing a good story. The trick is to not force yourself to finish. You sometimes need to take a break. That may be an hour, a week, a month, or longer. Don’t’ rush the process just to finish. You want to provide the best product. You readers deserve your best.

What is the most memorable thing asked/said by a reader about your work?

I never sought out to write a book for children with autism. However, I have found that several of my readers are on the spectrum. It’s a blessing to hear “My child loved your book. He couldn’t put it down.” I’ve also heard, “My child felt different until he realized that being different isn’t a bad thing. Your book showed him that he’s loved and capable of loving.” I love those moments! 

How long have you been writing?

For as long as I can remember. I’ve always been fascinated by storytelling.

When did you first realize you wanted to become a writer?

My love for writing first came about when I was in second grade. More on that later…

What is your work schedule like when you are writing?

I firmly believe that writing should be done strictly based around the ideas and notes you have at that time. You shouldn’t write just to write. We all have writers block or get backed into a corner from time to time. Take a break. Come back later. Don’t rush the process. The end result will be well worth it.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

I will often have an idea in my head and immediately write it down. Truly. Immediately. This means if I’m in bed, I grab a notebook and scribble it down before I forget. I’m sure my wife wishes I’d wait until the next morning to write something down.

How long does it take to write a book?

It took me a few years to finish my debut novel, The Canvas Adventures. I wanted to write something that was both timely and timeless. Meaning, I wanted to write about bullying, as I feel we’ve seen a recent rise through social media harassment. However, bullying isn’t new. I also wanted to write a book that helped someone overcome that type of abuse. Writing a book like that takes time-and in my case, about three years!

Do you have suggestions on how to become a better writer?

Network with other writers and learn their process. Learn what works for them and explain what works for you, too. Talk to others. Grow. Share. Don’t be afraid to change your mind. I had an ending figured out for The Canvas Adventures, but guess what? I ended up going a completely different route!

What challenges do you come across when writing/creating your story?

Writing evil characters is somehow easier than writing your protagonist. You want your protagonist to have flaws. Gabriel, in my novel, has plenty. But he’s also someone you want to root for in the end. My antagonists, on the other hand, seem a bit easier. I like to write the character of Marge Canton. She’s evil but you learn through her backstory why she became that way. It’s challenging to make your protagonists likeable but also find a way to make your antagonists’ motives understood.

What do you think makes a good story?

A good story is one you can’t put down. A good story is one that is relatable. Once your story is too far outside the realm of reality, you’ve lost your audience. It’s important when writing fiction/fantasy stories that your reader can picture themselves in those situations.

What does your family think of your writing? 

My family, particularly my wife, Shannon, have been tremendously supportive. They are also honest to a fault. So, if I’ve written something that isn’t the best-they will tell me straight out. I love the fact that they have all read my book and given me the ‘seal of approval,’ figuratively speaking.

Do you see writing as a career?

I see writing as a hobby. I love it. I’d love to turn it into a career, but I love my day job.

Do you have anything specific you’d like to tell the readers?

I like to encourage those who feel like they have a book inside them to go for it! It’s never too late to accomplish one of your dreams. It’s okay to be different. We were all made by our loving creator for a purpose. Find that purpose and go for it!

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

My love for writing first came about when I was in second grade. My teacher had us write daily in ‘reading logs,’ and encouraged us to write freely. I loved this part of the school day. I remember one day, she touched my shoulder, looked at what I wrote and said, “You’ll be a writer one day.” That has always stuck with me!

***

Visit the author’s website on www.tgbryant.com

Buy the book on Barnes and Noble https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-canvas-adventures-t-g-bryant/1130371545?ean=9781976716492