September Author Interview Answer #8 : What would you like to say to your readers?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the 7th post in this interview series. This is the last post in this interview series with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #8 from them.

“What would you like to say to your readers?

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

I’d love to thank my readers for spending their valuable time reading my books. My writing is based on my own experiences and point of view. I write for others who can relate to, or identify with my stories, in the hopes that they may be able to take a message or lesson from my writing.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
I want everyone who reads my work to write to me and give me his or her reaction.  It is invaluable for a writer to connect with her audience and learn what is working and what isn’t.  No one can tell you that more candidly or effectively than readers.  Critics always have an axe to grind.  Readers tend to be, as a majority, unfailingly accurate.  So go to my website and let me hear what you think!  I am there for you!
Thank you Linda and Debby for taking part in this interview! IBP wishes you all the best! 🙂
Thank you all for reading this interview with Linda and Debby.
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September Author Interview Answer #7:How do deal with people who disagree with your thoughts and views and how do you defend your point of views?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the sixth post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #7 from them.

“How do deal with people who disagree with your thoughts and views and how do you defend your point of views?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

I always try to empathize with people. Everyone is entitled to his or her thoughts and opinions. I don’t argue with people. If I’m confronted about a certain issue, I hear the person out and try to convey my point of view in an amicable manner, standing firm in my beliefs. I will try to express my logic for my thoughts and if I find I’m at a dead end, I quietly find a polite way to walk away.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
I try to change the subject and I never defend my viewpoint.  It’s a zero sum game.  People will believe what they want to believe and you can’t change their minds.  Likewise, they can’t change your mind about what you have achieved—or you should be strong and certain enough about what you have written so that they can’t.
It takes courage to express one’s opinion and we are not obliged to agree with critics all the time. We have our own opinions; to each his own. 
I’ll be posting the answers to the seventh question next: “What would you like to say to your readers? ”
Share your thoughts and views below.

September Author Interview Answer #6: What was the best and worst criticism that you have received for your work?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the fifth post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #6 from them.

“What was the best and worst criticism that you have received for your work? ”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

The best criticism came from my brother, when he told me that I held back a bit from going into more detail about my mother. I couldn’t bring myself to do so while she was still living, but I understood what he was conveying. I thankfully haven’t received any real criticism other than two bad reviews on Amazon. It is inspiring to know that I’ve connected with readers with the subjects I write about.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
In one review The New York Times Book Review called my writing “purple prose.”  In a review in the daily New York Times, Michiko Kakutani called it “powerful and affecting.”  Just two examples off the top of my head.  No one has ever quibbled with what I am trying to say—rather they either praise or denigrate the way I am trying to say it.
It takes courage to write the truth! You both have what it takes to write memoirs! Congratulations for that!
I’ll be posting the answers to the seventh question next: “How do deal with people who disagree with your thoughts and views and how do you defend your point of views? ”
Share your thoughts and views below.

September Author Interview Answer #5: How do you felt when you managed to complete a book?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the forth post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #5 from them.

“How do you felt when you managed to complete a book?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

After completing my book, besides the feeling of accomplishment, I was very apprehensive about publishing it. I stalled the publication for a few weeks, even after it was ready for print. I had several conversations with my siblings for approval, making sure that they were okay with my publishing the book. At the time, I was scared that my mother might read it and consider having me sued. That thought instilled a new burden of guilt I felt; only this time, it was self-imposed. And yes, my mother was quite capable of doing something like that. Someone did tell her I wrote the book and her response was venomous. Thankfully, nothing ever came of her threats. When I did finally publish my book, it was exhilarating.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
I always feel an immense sense of relief that I have finished a completed work, delighted to have been able to have managed it, and proud.  It is liberating to feel you have told your own story fully and well and not been influenced by outsiders or critics.  In the end, it is pleasing yourself that matters.
Thank you for sharing your opinions. Keep up the good work and we all admire your work so much! So, keep writing!
I’ll be posting the answers to the sixth question next: “What was the best and worst criticism that you have received for your work?”
Share your thoughts and views below.

September Author Interview Answer #4: How supportive is your family and friends in your writing career?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the third post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #3 from them.

“How supportive is your family and friends in your writing career? ”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

A writer’s life is complex. Much of the time, we live in our heads. I don’t feel that many of the people in my life really understand the life of a writer; all the time and seclusion involved. With saying this, I do have two of my closest friends that cheer me on and don’t give me a hard time for the lack of my presence in their lives. My husband is wonderful. He lets me be and doesn’t approach me when he sees me at the keyboard or with pen and paper at hand. He doesn’t quite understand all that I do, but he supports me, applauds me and loves me, so I am truly blessed. Others in my life have no conception what is involved to be a full-time writer and can’t get past regarding it as a past time or a hobby.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
Moderately.  My sister says, “I wish you could find something that would make you happy.”  My father wasn’t too keen, either.  My mother said before her death, “Never be a writer.  I will follow you around like an old gray ghost.”  So I guess I can’t say my family was supportive.  Friends are supportive, mostly, though some don’t buy my books, which I find odd.  I’d say the people who are the most supportive are my husband, my ex-husband, my readers and my friends who are writers.
I can’t thank you both enough for sharing your opinions genuinely. I can understand that the support from family members and friends can be a little disappointing when it comes to writing memoirs. This can be a bit different from the support fiction writers receive from their families and friends. Keep up the good work and we all admire your courage!
I’ll be posting the answers to the fifth question next: “Writing memoirs can be very liberating. Tell us how you felt when you managed to complete a book?”
Share your thoughts and views below.

September Author Interview Answer #3: How was the response from your family and friends when you first published a book?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the second post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #3 from them.

“How was the response from your family and friends when you first published a book?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

My friends and family cheered me on for getting the stories out of my head and onto paper. My sister thought it would be therapeutic to write my story, and help to alleviate some of the burden of guilt I carried for my mother. It was cathartic I have to admit. But erasing a lifetime of guilt is always a work in progress.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
It varied.  My first memoir, Searching for Mercy Strreet, was well-received and positively responded to by friends and the critics.  But my family was not so happy.  They felt I was revealing family secrets that should remain private.  I tried to ignore their attitudes as much as possible, even though I regretted that perhaps I had caused them some difficulty, because I understand that what is my truth is not necessarily their truth. And thus the rub. Writing a memoir is not the same as writing a biography, and I always tell family members who object to my viewpoint that they are free to write theirs.
I think when it comes to writing true stories, it will be quite shocking to people around you as they learn more about your thoughts and views. Some may agree, some may not. Whatever it is, it is your opinions and getting that out on print is very important. 
I’ll be posting the answers to the second question next: “How supportive is your family and friends in your writing career?”
Share your thoughts and views below.

September Author Interview Answer #2: Why do you choose to write memoirs?

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the first post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #2 from them.

“Why do you choose to write this genre and not anything else? What’s the reason or motivation behind it?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

I love to write nonfiction because I enjoy talking about real-life experiences and delving into reasons behind why things happen and results from the repercussions. I like to examine the flaws in events and characters and pull the life lessons from them.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
I also write fiction, but I find I feel most absolutely comfortable writing memoir.  I am motivated to tell what I see as the truth about my own life as a way of offering to readers a story with which they can identify.  After publishing my first two memoirs, which were candid and sometimes dark, I was overwhelmed with people writing to me and telling me that I had told their story, and that they were grateful for that.  It was a way of giving voice to all they had experienced on that particular subject and they felt less alone for it.  With Bespotted, my third memoir, I also got an immense amount of mail from people sharing the experience, but this time it was happiness and joy with which they identified, which was a refreshing change at this time in my life.
Great answers, ladies! I think it is absolutely wonderful to write true stories because it gives the writer the pleasure of helping others to voice out.
I’ll be posting the answers to the second question next: “How was the response from your family and friends when you first published a book?”
Share your thoughts and views below.