January Children’s Books Author Interview Answer #5 “What age group do you target?”

Children's Books Author Interview
Children’s Books Author Interview

Hello everyone! It’s time to reveal the answers for all 12 questions answered by 12 author participants in the January Group Author Interview, in the 12 genres, 12 authors, 12 months and 12 questions series!

I have to apologize for the delay in posting up the answers for Children’s Book interview series as we previously had two authors pulling out from the interview due to unforeseen circumstances. Nevertheless, we thank them for introducing two other authors for this interview series. But, now we now have not 12, but 14 authors participating in this group author interview.

Yes, I’m breaking the rules for this interview series! While looking for the last author to join us, I had to email a few of them at one go, just to make sure at least one of them gets back to me to complete this interview series. And guess what? I had not one, but THREE authors sending in their submissions at the same time! Can I say no to two of them? Would it be fair? No! So, yes, the more the merrier, I thought. Therefore, let’s welcome 14 authors for this interview series.

The first seven questions are from a ten-year old children’s book reviewer and BookTuber, named Neha Praveen. You can follow her on Twitter at @npstation2018

If you are an author and would like to participate in our upcoming interviews, check out this link, sign up and get your fans to ask their questions to the participating authors! The goal of this author interview is to increase the engagement between readers and authors, and to expose authors to new group of readers.

For more news, book promotion tips and offers, sign up for our newsletter to have the updates delivered right to your inbox.

So, the 5th question is “What age group do you target?”

1) Author #1 : Ann Harrison-Barnes

For Maggie’s Gravy Train Adventure, I targeted ages eight through eleven, though I don’t exclude anyone from reading my books.

2) Author #2: Samantha Hardin

My Zertle books are targeted at the 2-7 age range. The middle-grade novel I’m working on will be targeted to 4th-8th graders. Of course, anyone is welcome to read them at any age.

3) Author #3: C.J. Rains

I don’t have a particular age group. When I have an idea and begin a story is when I decide what age category it will fir best

4) Author #4: Padma Venkatraman

The Bridge Home is my first middle grade novel, and my previous novels, A Time To Dance, Island’s End and Climbing the Stairs were considered young adult.

5) Author #5: Elizabeth Gerlach

Children, preschool-second grade, 2-8 year olds .

6) Author #6: Cassie Miller

2 – 7 year olds

7) Author #7: Charlie Bee

Preschool to app. 12 years of age.

8) Author #8: Jerry Craft

Although I have illustrated a lot of picture books for beginning readers, the books I’ve written have all been for the middle grade market.

9) Author #9: Linda Covella

Mostly middle grade and younger teens, maybe eight to sixteen year olds. Though older teens and adults have enjoyed Yakimali’s Gift and even some of my other novels. My latest publication is a picture book, The Power of a Dream: Maria Feliciana Arballo, Latina Pioneer, but it’s targeted at kids five to ten years old. And I believe because of the historical aspect, the book could be used by teachers and parents as a teaching tool. It’s a narrative nonfiction, which means the book is written in story format rather than straight nonfiction factual style.

10) Author #10: Tracy K

children and young adult

11) Author #11: Beffy Parkin

My Charlie Cheese Books are aimed at 2 – 7 year olds, as the rhyming story and colourful and wacky images appeal to the younger children, and the older children are exposed to more complex vocabulary as well as a fun story. I am releasing a book in the very near future called The Macroodelzig, it contains an exciting rhyming story which again gives children exposure and the opportunity to learn new words.

12) Author #12: Lory Linn

The series I’m working on now is targeted for children from about 3 to 6 years old.

13) Author #13: Karen Magnen

So far I find I enjoy writing for young children up into the teen group.  I do have ideas for adult themed stories, which I may work on soon.

14) Author #14: Dr. Graham Clingbine

For readers who are children I would say between 6-14 years old. I think for the younger ones a parent could read the stories out loud (say at bedtime) to the child.

Stay tuned for the next post. Be sure to follow this website via email to get notified when new posts are being made.

Best regards,

Jasveena

Founder of International Book Promotion

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January Children’s Books Author Interview Answer #4 “Is there a lot of material that you have written that never gets published?”

Children's Books Author Interview
Children’s Books Author Interview

Hello everyone! It’s time to reveal the answers for all 12 questions answered by 12 author participants in the January Group Author Interview, in the 12 genres, 12 authors, 12 months and 12 questions series!

I have to apologize for the delay in posting up the answers for Children’s Book interview series as we previously had two authors pulling out from the interview due to unforeseen circumstances. Nevertheless, we thank them for introducing two other authors for this interview series. But, now we now have not 12, but 14 authors participating in this group author interview.

Yes, I’m breaking the rules for this interview series! While looking for the last author to join us, I had to email a few of them at one go, just to make sure at least one of them gets back to me to complete this interview series. And guess what? I had not one, but THREE authors sending in their submissions at the same time! Can I say no to two of them? Would it be fair? No! So, yes, the more the merrier, I thought. Therefore, let’s welcome 14 authors for this interview series.

The first seven questions are from a ten-year old children’s book reviewer and BookTuber, named Neha Praveen. You can follow her on Twitter at @npstation2018

If you are an author and would like to participate in our upcoming interviews, check out this link, sign up and get your fans to ask their questions to the participating authors! The goal of this author interview is to increase the engagement between readers and authors, and to expose authors to new group of readers.

For more news, book promotion tips and offers, sign up for our newsletter to have the updates delivered right to your inbox.

So, the 4th question is “Is there a lot of material that you have written that never gets published?”

1) Author #1 : Ann Harrison-Barnes

There are a few short stories that never got published in magazines, but I can’t say that they are never published, because I published them in a short story collection, which I will be rebranding in a few weeks.

2) Author #2: Samantha Hardin

At this point, the only thing I’ve tried to publish is Zertle the Crime-fighting Turtle and that went great. I am working on a middle-grade historical time travel series that I hope to traditionally publish eventually.

3) Author #3: C.J. Rains

I have a lot of material lying about as do most writers. I have future plans for just about all of it.

4) Author #4: Padma Venkatraman

It varies. I’m a mom first and foremost, and that takes precedence. I write as much and as often as I can – sometimes just in my head at night after a hectic day when I’m too tired to type.

5) Author #5: Elizabeth Gerlach

Children’s books… no. I have written various articles and blog posts that I publish on my own social channels and websites. A couple have been picked up by larger sites.

6) Author #6: Cassie Miller

Oh yes, the majority of my writing will go unpublished

7) Author #7: Charlie Bee

Rejections are part and parcel of becoming a published Author. There’s a lot of competition out there!

8) Author #8: Jerry Craft

I have maybe three manuscripts that are nearly complete that I never finished. And with New Kid, I probably cut 50 pages from the original draft, plus one or two characters in their entirety.

9) Author #9: Linda Covella

Yes! I’ve written several picture books that I’ve queried to agents and publishers, which were never accepted for publication. I don’t want to self-publish those since I need illustrations. I’ve learned picture books are so much more difficult to write than people realize. So mostly I stick with novels, which I do love to write.

10) Author #10: Tracy K

Not really, once I finish a book, I get it published, one way or another.

11) Author #11: Beffy Parkin

I do have a fair amount of material that is just scribbly notes! Too much! Sometimes I leave notes and come back to them at a later date, and sometimes I feel that those ideas are no longer relevant and can be left out of publishing.

12) Author #12: Lory Linn

Yes, but that is by my choice. As humans, I think we are our own worse critics and a lot of my work is put on the shelf because I’m not happy with it. When that happens, I consider it a rest period and I will go back and polish it up later.

13) Author #13: Karen Magnen

I had some trouble breaking into the publishing industry because I was a new author.  It is a shame that new authors really are pushed aside for older tried and true authors.  My publisher, Bob Scott,  specifically calls upon new authors to reach out to him.  I heard about him on a Facebook group for children’s book writers.   I sent him the first Rosie story, and the first Milton story.  He got back to me within two days with a contract, loving both of them.   He did not ask for money up front either.  I kept getting responses from publishing companies that wanted thousands of dollars for each book.  Yeah right! .

14) Author #14: Dr. Graham Clingbine

No, not really… but sometimes I write something and when I re-read it I do not like it and so I delete that part of the story. I then make changes to what I had originally written.

Stay tuned for the next post. Be sure to follow this website via email to get notified when new posts are being made.

Best regards,

Jasveena

Founder of International Book Promotion

January Children’s Books Author Interview Answer #3 “How much time do you write in a day?”

Children's Books Author Interview
Children’s Books Author Interview

Hello everyone! It’s time to reveal the answers for all 12 questions answered by 12 author participants in the January Group Author Interview, in the 12 genres, 12 authors, 12 months and 12 questions series!

I have to apologize for the delay in posting up the answers for Children’s Book interview series as we previously had two authors pulling out from the interview due to unforeseen circumstances. Nevertheless, we thank them for introducing two other authors for this interview series. But, now we now have not 12, but 14 authors participating in this group author interview.

Yes, I’m breaking the rules for this interview series! While looking for the last author to join us, I had to email a few of them at one go, just to make sure at least one of them gets back to me to complete this interview series. And guess what? I had not one, but THREE authors sending in their submissions at the same time! Can I say no to two of them? Would it be fair? No! So, yes, the more the merrier, I thought. Therefore, let’s welcome 14 authors for this interview series.

The first seven questions are from a ten-year old children’s book reviewer and BookTuber, named Neha Praveen. You can follow her on Twitter at @npstation2018

If you are an author and would like to participate in our upcoming interviews, check out this link, sign up and get your fans to ask their questions to the participating authors! The goal of this author interview is to increase the engagement between readers and authors, and to expose authors to new group of readers.

For more news, book promotion tips and offers, sign up for our newsletter to have the updates delivered right to your inbox.

So, the 3rd question is “How much time do you write in a day? ”

1) Author #1 : Ann Harrison-Barnes

My writing time varies from project to project. Sometimes I may write for a few minutes while riding down the road to pick up my daughter. Yet, there are other days or nights, where I can write for two or three hours without realizing it. It all depends on when the muse hits and I get into my creative zone.

2) Author #2: Samantha Hardin

Completely depends on the day. I work full time as a teacher so I’m often exhausted when I get home. On those nights, I often will be lucky to get thirty minutes in. On weekends, I might spend a few hours working.

3) Author #3: C.J. Rains

I try to write a little bit each day, but that doesn’t always happen, unfortunately. It depends my mood most of the time, and whether my muse shows up on that particular day. lol!

4) Author #4: Padma Venkatraman

It varies. I’m a mom first and foremost, and that takes precedence. I write as much and as often as I can – sometimes just in my head at night after a hectic day when I’m too tired to type.

5) Author #5: Elizabeth Gerlach

I probably write 2-3 times a week – I find I work on one manuscript at a time to finalize it. If I need to do a rewrite, I will take a 2-3 day break and come back to it just to be able to refresh my ideas and disconnect from it for a bit. 

6) Author #6: Cassie Miller

It varies, some days it can be upwards of six hours, but when inspiration eludes me I can go weeks without picking up a pen.

7) Author #7: Charlie Bee

This too depends on children, home, life, work balancing act really! As much as we can.

8) Author #8: Jerry Craft

I also did all of the illustrations for New Kid, so I wrote and sketched simultaneously. There were many days where I started at 8 or 9 AM and finished at 3 AM, stopping only for lunch and dinner and MAYBE a trip to the gym. I’m always writing AND drawing, even if it’s just doing page layouts or thumbnails, so it’s hard for me to separate the two.

9) Author #9: Linda Covella

That varies. It depends on what else I have to do that day. I have a small business with my husband, and I volunteer as a mentor for the local Young Writers Program. So I can spend anywhere from zero to maybe five hours a day writing.

10) Author #10: Tracy K

Depends! I like to write mainly at night when it is quite.

11) Author #11: Beffy Parkin

I put at least five hours aside each day to write, but as I said, ideas can come from anywhere, so I may be making notes in the middle of the night when I’ve got a busy brain!

12) Author #12: Lory Linn

Writing is my full-time job. Sometimes I write pieces for other people also, so it all depends on what I’m working on that day. I usually write at least four hours a day though.

13) Author #13: Karen Magnen

I do not write every day.  I would, but my publisher is overwhelmed trying to get the first seven stories I wrote him illustrated and published, and I promised him I would slow down! A typical children’s story geared for younger kids takes me only about two hours to write.  I did a larger chapter book for 8 – 10 year old children which should be published later this year, and I am currently editing a larger novel for young adults.

14) Author #14: Dr. Graham Clingbine

This is very variable. Sometimes I like to have a break and write nothing at all to refresh my thoughts and ideas. Other times I may write for 5 hours with a few short breaks in-between for a drink or to eat.

Stay tuned for the next post. Be sure to follow this website via email to get notified when new posts are being made.

Best regards,

Jasveena

Founder of International Book Promotion

January Children’s Books Author Interview Answer #2 “How do you come up with names for characters?”

Children's Books Author Interview
Children’s Books Author Interview

Hello everyone! It’s time to reveal the answers for all 12 questions answered by 12 author participants in the January Group Author Interview, in the 12 genres, 12 authors, 12 months and 12 questions series!

I have to apologize for the delay in posting up the answers for Children’s Book interview series as we previously had two authors pulling out from the interview due to unforeseen circumstances. Nevertheless, we thank them for introducing two other authors for this interview series. But, now we now have not 12, but 14 authors participating in this group author interview.

Yes, I’m breaking the rules for this interview series! While looking for the last author to join us, I had to email a few of them at one go, just to make sure at least one of them gets back to me to complete this interview series. And guess what? I had not one, but THREE authors sending in their submissions at the same time! Can I say no to two of them? Would it be fair? No! So, yes, the more the merrier, I thought. Therefore, let’s welcome 14 authors for this interview series.

The first seven questions are from a ten-year old children’s book reviewer and BookTuber, named Neha Praveen. You can follow her on Twitter at @npstation2018

If you are an author and would like to participate in our upcoming interviews, check out this link, sign up and get your fans to ask their questions to the participating authors! The goal of this author interview is to increase the engagement between readers and authors, and to expose authors to new group of readers.

For more news, book promotion tips and offers, sign up for our newsletter to have the updates delivered right to your inbox.

So, the 2nd question is “How do you come up with names for characters?”

1) Author #1 : Ann Harrison-Barnes

Sometimes I get inspired by books I read, while at other times I may ask other authors for suggestions on ways to come up with names for my characters.

2) Author #2: Samantha Hardin

Sometimes, I use name generators online. Other times, I just think for a little while and come up with some.

3) Author #3: C.J. Rains

Names can be tricky. I’ve sometimes used names of my family members, other times I use names that seem to rhyme with words in the book or just sound interesting. Something that I feel will stick in the head of the reader

4) Author #4: Padma Venkatraman

The protagonist of my debut novel, CLIMBING THE STAIRS, is called Vidya – and I think it’s because subconsciously I knew that Vidya means knowledge, clarity and learning, in sanskrit and it fits because the main character yearns to climb a forbidden staircase to enter a library. I also have 2 cousins called VIdya, one was the daughter of my favorite aunt who always believed in me as a writer and naming a character after her daughter felt like a tribute to her.A Time to Dance also had a main character whose name began with a V – and it’s become a bit of a tradition with me now, because the narrator in THE BRIDGE HOME is Viji! 

5) Author #5: Elizabeth Gerlach

Since the book was inspired by my son Benjamin, the name was simple. His brother Colin and sister Ava also make an appearance in the first book.

6) Author #6: Cassie Miller

It depends, if it is based upon a friend or family member I ask them if they would mind their name being used or if they have a code name they would prefer. If the character is completely fictional I spend a lot of time on Google researching names and their meanings trying to find the perfect fit for what I want the character to embody

7) Author #7: Charlie Bee

That very much depends on the character and how we would like the character to be perceived, for example if we are writing a story for children  and it involves a mean character or villain, we would consider using a name that isn’t flattering, but also a little funny, to make the character less scary for the more timid reader. A good example of this would be Professor Toefluff.

8) Author #8: Jerry Craft

I usually take a long time to come up with the right names. Most times, unless I use one of my friend’s names, if it comes too quickly, I toss it out. I never want to use names that are so common that they appear stereotypical.

9) Author #9: Linda Covella

Often I search “baby name” sites for a name that seems to fit the character. If my story is historical, I’ll look up what names were popular in the character’s time period. Or, I may pick a name because of its meaning. For instance, “Fernanda,” the main character in Yakimali’s Gift, means “adventurous one,” which Fernanda is and longs for adventure in her life.

10) Author #10: Tracy K

From other stories I have read

11) Author #11: Beffy Parkin

Naming the characters is lots of fun. They can be bizarre and wonderful names, or names that everyone knows, as long as it suits that character. 

12) Author #12: Lory Linn

I guess that depends on the personality and age of the character. If I’m using the character’s name in the title then I like it to be something catchy, something people will remember, especially if it’s a children’s book.

13) Author #13: Karen Magnen

The names are sometimes people or animals in my life, otherwise I just pick names out of the blue. Common names that a child reading the story may have.

14) Author #14: Dr. Graham Clingbine

I use first names of friends from school days or sometimes family members (but only if they ‘’feel’’ right for the story I am writing). If not I will just use names I like.

Stay tuned for the next post. Be sure to follow this website via email to get notified when new posts are being made.

Best regards,

Jasveena

Founder of International Book Promotion

January Children’s Books Author Interview Answer #1 “What is your source of ideas for a new book?”

Children's Books Author Interview
Children’s Books Author Interview

Hello everyone! It’s time to reveal the answers for all 12 questions answered by 12 author participants in the January Group Author Interview, in the 12 genres, 12 authors, 12 months and 12 questions series!

I have to apologize for the delay in posting up the answers for Children’s Book interview series as we previously had two authors pulling out from the interview due to unforeseen circumstances. Nevertheless, we thank them for introducing two other authors for this interview series. But, now we now have not 12, but 14 authors participating in this group author interview.

Yes, I’m breaking the rules for this interview series! While looking for the last author to join us, I had to email a few of them at one go, just to make sure at least one of them gets back to me to complete this interview series. And guess what? I had not one, but THREE authors sending in their submissions at the same time! Can I say no to two of them? Would it be fair? No! So, yes, the more the merrier, I thought. Therefore, let’s welcome 14 authors for this interview series.

The first seven questions are from a ten-year old children’s book reviewer and BookTuber, named Neha Praveen. You can follow her on Twitter at @npstation2018

If you are an author and would like to participate in our upcoming interviews, check out this link, sign up and get your fans to ask their questions to the participating authors! The goal of this author interview is to increase the engagement between readers and authors, and to expose authors to new group of readers.

For more news, book promotion tips and offers, sign up for our newsletter to have the updates delivered right to your inbox.

So, the 1st question is “What is your source of ideas for a new book?”

1) Author #1 : Ann Harrison-Barnes

That depends on the book. As I’ve heard authors say from time to time, ideas come from everywhere. However, Inspiration can come from a variety of sources too. Maggie’s Gravy Train Adventure was inspired by a tweet about a gravy train.

2) Author #2: Samantha Hardin

They honestly kind of just pop up in my brain. They don’t seem to come from anywhere specific.

3) Author #3: C.J. Rains

My ideas can come from almost anything. Sometimes an idea will pop in my head right out of nowhere, while other times they can come from something I see, something I’ve read, or just from a personal experience.

4) Author #4: Padma Venkatraman

Until now,  all my books are in part based on a true story. The main characters are also inspired in some way by someone real. For example, Vidya in Climbing the Stairs is inspired by my mother and my family history (in India in the 1940’s); A Time to Dance is inspired by Shoba Sharma and other dancers I saw; and all four main characters in The Bridge Home are inspired by friends I had as a child. 

5) Author #5: Elizabeth Gerlach

My book Ben’s Adventures is actually inspired by my son Benjamin. He lived with cerebral palsy and various medical challenges so I wanted to show that even though a child might have physical differences, he/she can still be a kid, daydream, pretend, play, have friendship and be happy. So far, my ideas have been based on our family experiences, vacations at the beach, trips to the circus (new manuscript), etc.

6) Author #6: Cassie Miller

I get my ideas from my life and the lives of my loved ones. Everyone is so unique and interested in such a wide range of things I have a never ending and always evolving pool of ideas to pick from

7) Author #7: Charlie Bee

Anything may spark an idea, for example imagery and sounds, music, conversations, literally anything.

8) Author #8: Jerry Craft

When I was writing New Kid, my middle grade graphic novel, I used a lot of my memories as a kid starting a new school. I had always attended small schools that had classes of 25 students, of which most were African American. But the high school I attended had me as one of maybe 10 African American students out of a class of over 100. Plus, like me, Jordan Banks is one of the youngest and smallest kids in his class.

9) Author #9: Linda Covella

My inspiration for my books comes from many places: personal experiences, places I’ve been, books and other publications I’ve read. For instance, reading about the 1775 colonization expedition from Mexico to California inspired my novel Yakimali’s Gift and picture book The Power of a Dream: Maria Feliciana Arballo, Latina Pioneer.

I’ve always liked ghost stories, so that partially inspired my Ghost Whisperer series, which also take place in Santa Cruz where I live. Book one, The Castle Blues Quake, involves an earthquake, of which I’ve experienced numerous times living in California. Part of the plot for book two, The Ghosts of Pebble Brook Lodge, was inspired by a true story of a girl drowning in a creek that runs through the dining room of the local Brookdale Lodge.

And with Cryptogram Chaos, I was tired of seeing computer games with all the fighting and killing, so my fourteen-year-old characters create a game where gamers advance to different levels by answering secret codes, or cryptograms. Each of the three levels has increasingly exciting things for the gamers to do, such as eat all the candy and ice cream they want, undersea adventures, racing cars, bungee jumping, and becoming powerful avatars.

10) Author #10: Tracy K

From my own life experiences.

11) Author #11: Beffy Parkin

Ideas can come from anywhere, whilst doing the most boring activities in the world! It could be from a mispronounced word that sounds like a fun character’s name.

12) Author #12: Lory Linn

I simply use the sources I have in front of me; nature such as watching birds play in the water, people at the beach or the mall, watching my dog play, and most recently I am writing a book based on my granddaughter.

13) Author #13: Karen Magnen

I have so many ideas for stories.  I write from experience, Milton was a real dog.   I also write about topics that interest me, such as fairies and dragons. I write stories that are funny, and teach some simple lessons.

14) Author #14: Dr. Graham Clingbine

I think about real-life fun or funny experiences that happened in my childhood that have remained in my memory as an adult.

Stay tuned for the next post. Be sure to follow this website via email to get notified when new posts are being made.

Best regards,

Jasveena

Founder of International Book Promotion

January Children’s Book Author Interview: Author #14 Dr Graham Clingbine

Dr. Graham

Dr Graham Clingbine was born in Hammersmith (London) but grew up and spent his childhood in Harrow and lived in Plaistow and Ilford (UK). Graham has BSc and MSc degrees from the University of London (Bedford College, Regents Park) in the areas of Biological Science and Neurobiology. His award of PhD followed a research programme on the memory mechanisms of the brain. Graham spent a long career in education at schools and collegs before retiring from City & Islington College in North London from his post as Senior Lecturer in Human Anatomy & Physiology and Biochemistry. In addition to his teaching activities, Graham spent many years as a home-based network marketer. Graham is a multi-genre author with books on science fiction, UFOs, network marketing, human sexuality and children’s stories. His hobbies include fishing, international travel and administering an online book and authors group.

January Children’s Book Author Interview: Author #13 Karen Magnan

Book by Karen

Hi there, my name is Karen Magnan and I am a new author. As of right now my focus has been on writing children’s books, and books for young adults.  My story is interesting in that I did not write my first story until I was in my mid 50’s, and I quickly became a writing machine. I have now sent 7 books to my publisher just since December 2018.

I moved to Florida and went from working 14 hour days to just part time, and I suddenly had a lot of free time I did not know what to do with.  One day I was bored and thought, I think I will  finally write that children’s book I wanted to write. Two hours later, my first story was written, “The Dragon Who Got the Fairy Godmother to Like Vegetables.”

The next week I wrote a second book about Rosie the Pink Dragon and then a third the week after that. Each story took about two hours to write and then some editing, and it was done.  I am now writing another series about Milton, who is a lovable, big German Shepherd/Hound dog.  In the first book he helps his owner, a boy named Charlie, get confidence and make friends when Charlie sneaks Milton into school for Show and Tell.  The story is called, “Show and Tell Day for Milton.”

These two books are going to be published by Bob Scott Publishing early this spring.  I have an illustrator working on each book, and they are doing fabulous work, and they are both almost done with the pictures.  Once they are done, Bob Scott will get to work on printing them and releasing them, and that should only take about a month or so.  It is all so very exciting getting to see my stories come to life with the illustrations. I truly feel blessed.